The effect of a whey protein supplement dose on satiety and food intake in resistance training athletes

Kristen L. MacKenzie-Shalders, Nuala M. Byrne, Gary J. Slater, Neil A. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Many athletes perform resistance training and consume dietary protein as a strategy to promote anabolic adaptation. Due to its high satiety value, the regular addition of supplemented dietary protein could plausibly displace other key macronutrients such as carbohydrate in an athlete's diet. This effect will be influenced by the form and dose of protein. Therefore, this study assessed the impact of liquid whey protein dose manipulation on subjective sensations of appetite and food intake in a cohort of athletes. 

Design: Ten male athletes who performed both resistance and aerobic (endurance) training (21.2 ± 2.3 years; 181.7 ± 5.7 cm and 80.8 ± 6.1 kg) were recruited. In four counter-balanced testing sessions they consumed a manipulated whey protein supplement (20, 40, 60 or 80 g protein) 1 hour after a standardised breakfast. Subsequent energy intake was measured 3 hours after the protein supplement using an ad libitum test meal. Subjective appetite sensations were measured periodically during the test day using visual analogue scales. 

Results: All conditions resulted in a significant decrease in ratings of hunger (50-65%; P < 0.05) at the time of supplement consumption. However, there were no significant differences between the conditions at any time point for subjective appetite sensations or for energy consumed in the ad libitum meal: 4382 ± 1004, 4643 ± 982, 4514 ± 1112, 4177 ± 1494 kJ respectively. 

Conclusion: Increasing whey protein supplement dose above 20 g did not result in a measurable increase in satiety or decrease in food intake. However, the inclusion of additional whey protein supplementation where not otherwise consumed could plausibly reduce dietary intake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-184
Number of pages7
JournalAppetite
Volume92
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

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Resistance Training
Athletes
Appetite
Eating
Dietary Proteins
Meals
Proteins
Hunger
Breakfast
Energy Intake
Visual Analog Scale
Carbohydrates
Diet
Whey Proteins

Cite this

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title = "The effect of a whey protein supplement dose on satiety and food intake in resistance training athletes",
abstract = "Objective: Many athletes perform resistance training and consume dietary protein as a strategy to promote anabolic adaptation. Due to its high satiety value, the regular addition of supplemented dietary protein could plausibly displace other key macronutrients such as carbohydrate in an athlete's diet. This effect will be influenced by the form and dose of protein. Therefore, this study assessed the impact of liquid whey protein dose manipulation on subjective sensations of appetite and food intake in a cohort of athletes. Design: Ten male athletes who performed both resistance and aerobic (endurance) training (21.2 ± 2.3 years; 181.7 ± 5.7 cm and 80.8 ± 6.1 kg) were recruited. In four counter-balanced testing sessions they consumed a manipulated whey protein supplement (20, 40, 60 or 80 g protein) 1 hour after a standardised breakfast. Subsequent energy intake was measured 3 hours after the protein supplement using an ad libitum test meal. Subjective appetite sensations were measured periodically during the test day using visual analogue scales. Results: All conditions resulted in a significant decrease in ratings of hunger (50-65{\%}; P < 0.05) at the time of supplement consumption. However, there were no significant differences between the conditions at any time point for subjective appetite sensations or for energy consumed in the ad libitum meal: 4382 ± 1004, 4643 ± 982, 4514 ± 1112, 4177 ± 1494 kJ respectively. Conclusion: Increasing whey protein supplement dose above 20 g did not result in a measurable increase in satiety or decrease in food intake. However, the inclusion of additional whey protein supplementation where not otherwise consumed could plausibly reduce dietary intake.",
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The effect of a whey protein supplement dose on satiety and food intake in resistance training athletes. / MacKenzie-Shalders, Kristen L.; Byrne, Nuala M.; Slater, Gary J.; King, Neil A.

In: Appetite, Vol. 92, 01.09.2015, p. 178-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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