The effect of a caffeinated mouth-rinse on endurance cycling time-trial performance

Thomas M. Doering, James W. Fell, Michael D. Leveritt, Ben Desbrow, Cecilia M. Shing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate if acute caffeine exposure via mouth-rinse improved endurance cycling time-trial performance in well-trained cyclists. It was hypothesized that caffeine exposure at the mouth would enhance endurance cycling time-trial performance. Ten well-trained male cyclists (mean± SD: 32.9 ± 7.5 years, 74.7 ± 5.3kg, 176.8 ± 5.1cm, VO2peak = 59.8 ± 3.5ml·kg -1·min-1) completed two experimental time-trials following 24 hr of dietary and exercise standardization. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was employed whereby cyclists completed a time-trial in the fastest time possible, which was equivalent work to cycling at 75% of peak aerobic power output for 60 min. Cyclists were administered 25ml mouth-rinses for 10 s containing either placebo or 35mg of anhydrous caffeine eight times throughout the time-trial. Perceptual and physiological variables were recorded throughout. No significant improvement in time-trial performance was observed with caffeine (3918 ± 243s) compared with placebo mouth-rinse (3940 ± 227s). No elevation in plasma caffeine was detected due to the mouth-rinse conditions. Caffeine mouth-rinse had no significant effect on rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, rate of oxygen consumption or blood lactate concentration. Eight exposures of a 35 mg dose of caffeine at the buccal cavity for 10s does not significantly enhance endurance cycling time-trial performance, nor does it elevate plasma caffeine concentration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-97
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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caffeine
Caffeine
Mouth
mouth
placebos
Placebos
Cheek
standardization
Oxygen Consumption
Cross-Over Studies
oxygen consumption
lactates
heart rate
Lactic Acid
exercise
Heart Rate
blood
dosage

Cite this

Doering, Thomas M. ; Fell, James W. ; Leveritt, Michael D. ; Desbrow, Ben ; Shing, Cecilia M. / The effect of a caffeinated mouth-rinse on endurance cycling time-trial performance. In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 90-97.
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abstract = "The purpose of this study was to investigate if acute caffeine exposure via mouth-rinse improved endurance cycling time-trial performance in well-trained cyclists. It was hypothesized that caffeine exposure at the mouth would enhance endurance cycling time-trial performance. Ten well-trained male cyclists (mean± SD: 32.9 ± 7.5 years, 74.7 ± 5.3kg, 176.8 ± 5.1cm, VO2peak = 59.8 ± 3.5ml·kg -1·min-1) completed two experimental time-trials following 24 hr of dietary and exercise standardization. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was employed whereby cyclists completed a time-trial in the fastest time possible, which was equivalent work to cycling at 75{\%} of peak aerobic power output for 60 min. Cyclists were administered 25ml mouth-rinses for 10 s containing either placebo or 35mg of anhydrous caffeine eight times throughout the time-trial. Perceptual and physiological variables were recorded throughout. No significant improvement in time-trial performance was observed with caffeine (3918 ± 243s) compared with placebo mouth-rinse (3940 ± 227s). No elevation in plasma caffeine was detected due to the mouth-rinse conditions. Caffeine mouth-rinse had no significant effect on rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, rate of oxygen consumption or blood lactate concentration. Eight exposures of a 35 mg dose of caffeine at the buccal cavity for 10s does not significantly enhance endurance cycling time-trial performance, nor does it elevate plasma caffeine concentration.",
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The effect of a caffeinated mouth-rinse on endurance cycling time-trial performance. / Doering, Thomas M.; Fell, James W.; Leveritt, Michael D.; Desbrow, Ben; Shing, Cecilia M.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Vol. 24, No. 1, 2014, p. 90-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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