The diversity of retroviral diseases of the immune system

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Retroviruses have been implicated as causative agents for a range of diseases including neoplasia, autoimmunity and immunosuppression. No two retroviruses carry the same complement of genes and for this reason it is not surprising that they induce a variety of different disease states. One common element in retroviral evolution has been the need to avoid immune recognition in order to persist within the host. A comparative approach, looking at various persistent retroviruses, has been used to pin-point the types of genetic adaptations adopted by retroviruses to remain hidden, often within the T cell compartment. Most of these retroviruses are T-cell-tropic and the diseases which they induce usually reflect the effect of the retrovirus on normal lymphocyte function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-199
Number of pages7
JournalImmunology and Cell Biology
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Immune System Diseases
Retroviridae
T-Lymphocytes
Autoimmunity
Immunosuppression
Lymphocytes
Genes
Neoplasms

Cite this

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title = "The diversity of retroviral diseases of the immune system",
abstract = "Retroviruses have been implicated as causative agents for a range of diseases including neoplasia, autoimmunity and immunosuppression. No two retroviruses carry the same complement of genes and for this reason it is not surprising that they induce a variety of different disease states. One common element in retroviral evolution has been the need to avoid immune recognition in order to persist within the host. A comparative approach, looking at various persistent retroviruses, has been used to pin-point the types of genetic adaptations adopted by retroviruses to remain hidden, often within the T cell compartment. Most of these retroviruses are T-cell-tropic and the diseases which they induce usually reflect the effect of the retrovirus on normal lymphocyte function.",
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The diversity of retroviral diseases of the immune system. / O'Neill, H C.

In: Immunology and Cell Biology, Vol. 70 , No. 3, 06.1992, p. 193-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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