The Complexity of Stuttering Behavior in Adults and Adolescents: Relationship to Age, Severity, Mental Health, Impact of Stuttering, and Behavioral Treatment Outcome

Sue O’brian, Mark Jones, Ann Packman, Mark Onslow*, Ross Menzies, Robyn Lowe, Angela Cream, Anna Hearne, Sally Hewat, Elisabeth Harrison, Susan Block, Anne Briem

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated the complexity of stuttering behavior. It described and classified the complexity of stuttering behavior in relation to age, behavioral treatment outcomes, stuttering severity, anxiety-related mental health, impact of stuttering, and gender. Method: For this study, a taxonomy was developed—LBDL-C7—which was based on the Lidcombe Behavioral Data Language of stuttering. It was used by five experienced judges to analyze the complexity of stuttering behavior for 84 adults and adolescents before and after speech restructuring treatment. Data were 3,100 stuttering moments, which were analyzed with nominal logistic regression. Results: The complexity of stuttering behavior appears not to change as a result of treatment, but it does appear to change with advancing age. Complexity of stuttering behavior was found to be independently associated with clinician stuttering severity scores but not with percentage of syllables stuttered or self-reported stuttering severity. Complexity of stuttering behavior was not associated with gender, anxiety, or impact of stuttering. Conclusion: Clinical and research applications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2446-2458
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume65
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2022

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