The challenge of ‘big data’ for data protection

Christopher Kuner, Fred H Cate, Christopher Millard, Dan Jerker B Svantesson

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearch

Abstract

Data protection, like almost everything else in our lives, is challenged by the advent of ‘big data’. The Economist reports in its 2012 Outlook that the quantity of global digital data expanded from 130 exabytes in 2005 to 1,227 in 2010, and is predicted to rise to 7,910 exabytes in 2015.1

An exabyte is a quintillion bytes. If you find that hard to visualize, consider this: someone has calculated that if you loaded an exabyte of data on to DVDs in slimline jewel cases, and then loaded them into Boeing 747 aircraft, it would take 13,513 planes to transport one exabyte of data. Using DVDs to move the data collected globally in 2010 would require a fleet of more than 16 million jumbo jets.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-49
Number of pages2
JournalInternational Data Privacy Law
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2012

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Kuner, Christopher ; Cate, Fred H ; Millard, Christopher ; Svantesson, Dan Jerker B. / The challenge of ‘big data’ for data protection. In: International Data Privacy Law. 2012 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 47-49.
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The challenge of ‘big data’ for data protection. / Kuner, Christopher; Cate, Fred H; Millard, Christopher; Svantesson, Dan Jerker B.

In: International Data Privacy Law, Vol. 2, No. 2, 01.05.2012, p. 47-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearch

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