The association of sitting time with sarcopenia status and physical performance at baseline and 18-month follow-up in the residential aged care setting

N Reid, J W Keogh, P Swinton, P A Gardiner, Timothy Henwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This study investigated the association of sitting time with sarcopenia and physical performance in residential aged care residents at baseline and 18-month follow-up. Measures included the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (sitting time), European Working Group definition of sarcopenia, and the short physical performance battery (physical performance). Logistic regression and linear regression analyses were used to investigate associations. For each hour of sitting, the unadjusted odds ratio of sarcopenia was 1.16 (95% confidence interval [0.98, 1.37]). Linear regression showed that each hour of sitting was significantly associated with a 0.2-unit lower score for performance. Associations of baseline sitting with follow-up sarcopenia status and performance were nonsignificant. Cross-sectionally, increased sitting time in residential aged care may be detrimentally associated with sarcopenia and physical performance. Based on current reablement models of care, future studies should investigate if reducing sedentary time improves performance among adults in end of life care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)445-450
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume26
Issue number3
Early online date16 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

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Sarcopenia
Linear Models
Terminal Care
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals

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title = "The association of sitting time with sarcopenia status and physical performance at baseline and 18-month follow-up in the residential aged care setting",
abstract = "This study investigated the association of sitting time with sarcopenia and physical performance in residential aged care residents at baseline and 18-month follow-up. Measures included the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (sitting time), European Working Group definition of sarcopenia, and the short physical performance battery (physical performance). Logistic regression and linear regression analyses were used to investigate associations. For each hour of sitting, the unadjusted odds ratio of sarcopenia was 1.16 (95{\%} confidence interval [0.98, 1.37]). Linear regression showed that each hour of sitting was significantly associated with a 0.2-unit lower score for performance. Associations of baseline sitting with follow-up sarcopenia status and performance were nonsignificant. Cross-sectionally, increased sitting time in residential aged care may be detrimentally associated with sarcopenia and physical performance. Based on current reablement models of care, future studies should investigate if reducing sedentary time improves performance among adults in end of life care.",
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The association of sitting time with sarcopenia status and physical performance at baseline and 18-month follow-up in the residential aged care setting. / Reid, N; Keogh, J W; Swinton, P; Gardiner, P A; Henwood, Timothy.

In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.07.2018, p. 445-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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