Ten years of medical education registrars: Value added?

Victoria Brazil, Lorna Davin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: There is a paucity of any long-term follow up of trainees’ career pathways or organisational outcomes from medical education registrar posts in emergency medicine training. We report on the experience of a selected group of medical education trainees during and subsequent to their post and reflect on the value added to emergency medical education at three institutions. Methods: We conducted an online survey study, examining quantitative outcomes and qualitative reflections, of emergency physicians who had previously undertaken a medical education registrar post. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise responses to Likert items. The authors independently analysed and interpreted the reflective responses to identify key themes and sub-themes. Results: Nineteen of 21 surveys were completed. Most respondents were in formal educational roles, in addition to clinical practice. The thematic analysis revealed that the medical education registrar experience, and the subsequent contribution of these trainees to medical education, is significantly shaped by external factors. These include the extent of faculty support, and the value placed on medical education by hospitals/departments/leaders. Acquisition of knowledge and skills in medical education was only part of a broader developmental journey and transitioning of identity for the trainees. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that medical education trainees in emergency medicine progress to educational roles, and most respondents attribute their career progression to the medical education training experience. We recommend that medical education registrar programmes need to be valued within the clinical service, supported by faculty and a ‘community of practice’, to support trainees’ transition to clinician educator leadership roles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)808-813
Number of pages6
JournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
Volume30
Issue number6
Early online date22 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Brazil, Victoria ; Davin, Lorna. / Ten years of medical education registrars : Value added?. In: Emergency Medicine Australasia. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 808-813.
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abstract = "Objective: There is a paucity of any long-term follow up of trainees’ career pathways or organisational outcomes from medical education registrar posts in emergency medicine training. We report on the experience of a selected group of medical education trainees during and subsequent to their post and reflect on the value added to emergency medical education at three institutions. Methods: We conducted an online survey study, examining quantitative outcomes and qualitative reflections, of emergency physicians who had previously undertaken a medical education registrar post. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise responses to Likert items. The authors independently analysed and interpreted the reflective responses to identify key themes and sub-themes. Results: Nineteen of 21 surveys were completed. Most respondents were in formal educational roles, in addition to clinical practice. The thematic analysis revealed that the medical education registrar experience, and the subsequent contribution of these trainees to medical education, is significantly shaped by external factors. These include the extent of faculty support, and the value placed on medical education by hospitals/departments/leaders. Acquisition of knowledge and skills in medical education was only part of a broader developmental journey and transitioning of identity for the trainees. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that medical education trainees in emergency medicine progress to educational roles, and most respondents attribute their career progression to the medical education training experience. We recommend that medical education registrar programmes need to be valued within the clinical service, supported by faculty and a ‘community of practice’, to support trainees’ transition to clinician educator leadership roles.",
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Ten years of medical education registrars : Value added? / Brazil, Victoria; Davin, Lorna.

In: Emergency Medicine Australasia, Vol. 30, No. 6, 12.2018, p. 808-813.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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