Teaching independent learning skills in the first year: A positive psychology strategy for promoting law student well-being

Rachael Field, James Duffy, Anna Huggins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Empirical evidence in Australia and overseas has established that in many university disciplines, students begin to experience elevated levels of psychological distress in their first year of study. There is now a considerable body of empirical data that establishes that this is a significant problem for law students. Psychological distress may hamper a law student's capacity to learn successfully, and certainly hinders their ability to thrive in the tertiary environment. We know from Self-Determination Theory (SDT), a conceptual branch of positive psychology, that supporting students' autonomy in turn supports their well-being. This article seeks to connect the literature on law student well-being and independent learning using Self-Determination Theory (SDT) as the theoretical bridge. We argue that deliberate instruction in the development of independent learning skills in the first year curriculum is autonomy supportive. It can therefore lay the foundation for academic and personal success at university, and may be a protective factor against decline in law student psychological well-being.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Learning Design
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

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psychology
well-being
Law
Teaching
learning
student
self-determination
autonomy
university
overseas
instruction
curriculum
ability
evidence
experience

Cite this

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Teaching independent learning skills in the first year : A positive psychology strategy for promoting law student well-being. / Field, Rachael; Duffy, James; Huggins, Anna.

In: Journal of Learning Design, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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