Teaching Business Law to Non Law Students

Florentina Benga

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearch

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Abstract

It is expected that students of Business programs will enter into the business world with knowledge of different areas of law and the legal system. Knowing the legislative requirements and where to research information are critical skills for any business decision maker. Yet, research and practice suggest that business law subjects are perceived as particularly challenging by business students or non law students. This article provides an insight into the likely reasons for business law subjects being so challenging for non law students and the implications for the teaching strategies and approaches. In particular, it looks at the way the business law curriculum is designed, the assessment requirements and their alignment with the students’ needs, learning styles and prior knowledge. The article explores the current approaches to teaching business law and provides suggestions for continuous improvement. It adopts a managerial approach to a business law course that is realistic and practical for future business practitioners. The article looks at the business law subject as a discipline per se but also an area across disciplines as students are to be equipped with both business and law skills. The author acknowledges that some suggestions for improvement might already be in place in some educational environments, but it is anticipated that sharing the experience and practice while tutoring Business Law at the University of the Sunshine Coast, could improve the approaches to teaching Business Law elsewhere.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes
EventAustralasian Law Teachers Association Conference (ALTA): My Lawyer Rules: Assuring Legal and Education Standards - Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 3 Jul 20116 Jul 2011
Conference number: 66th
http://www.alta.edu.au/2011-ALTA-Conference

Conference

ConferenceAustralasian Law Teachers Association Conference (ALTA)
Abbreviated titleALTA
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period3/07/116/07/11
Internet address

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Law
Teaching
student
teaching strategy
legal system
decision maker
curriculum
knowledge
learning
experience

Cite this

Benga, F. (2011). Teaching Business Law to Non Law Students. Paper presented at Australasian Law Teachers Association Conference (ALTA), Brisbane, Australia.
Benga, Florentina. / Teaching Business Law to Non Law Students. Paper presented at Australasian Law Teachers Association Conference (ALTA), Brisbane, Australia.
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Benga, F 2011, 'Teaching Business Law to Non Law Students' Paper presented at Australasian Law Teachers Association Conference (ALTA), Brisbane, Australia, 3/07/11 - 6/07/11, .

Teaching Business Law to Non Law Students. / Benga, Florentina.

2011. Paper presented at Australasian Law Teachers Association Conference (ALTA), Brisbane, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearch

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Benga F. Teaching Business Law to Non Law Students. 2011. Paper presented at Australasian Law Teachers Association Conference (ALTA), Brisbane, Australia.