Stuttering severity and educational attainment

Sue O'Brian*, Mark Jones, Ann Packman, Ross Menzies, Mark Onslow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between self-reported stuttering severity ratings and educational attainment. Method: Participants were 147 adults seeking treatment for stuttering. At pretreatment assessment, each participant reported the highest educational level they had attained and rated their typical and worst stuttering severity on a 9-point scale for a range of speaking situations. These included: (1) talking with a family member, (2) talking with a familiar person, not a family member, (3) talking in a group of people, (4) talking with a stranger, (5) talking with an authority figure such as a work manager or teacher, (6) talking on the telephone, (7) ordering food or drink, and (8) giving their name and address. Results: There was a significant negative relationship between highest educational achievement and mean self-reported stuttering severity rating for the eight situations. Conclusions: Future research is needed to investigate how this result should be addressed in educational institutions.Educational objectives: The reader will be able to: (1) describe the negative effects of stuttering through childhood to adulthood; (2) identify some of the negative consequences associated with stuttering on peer and teacher relationships, and academic performance at school; and (3) summarise the relationship between stuttering severity and educational attainment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)86-92
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Fluency Disorders
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

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