Study of climate change and field research in zoology: Are they compatible with research student training programs?

Shelley Burgin, Pauline Ross

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Biological diversity in Australia has been dwindling, even without the full onslaught of climate change with the anticipated decrease in numbers of species, communities and effects on associated ecosystems. This makes the impacts of climate change attractive for students undertaking research training in field biology in undergraduate and graduate zoology programs. The projects undertaken by such students are, of necessity, short-term and typically vary between several months and two years of field work. In this paper we consider if such projects are compatible with studying the effects of climate change on Australian native fauna. We conclude that there are limited opportunities for explicit outcomes; however, the research is valuable in a broader context of underpinning longer term research.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWildlife & climate change
Subtitle of host publicationTowards robust conservation strategies for Australian fauna
Place of PublicationNew South Wales
PublisherRoyal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Pages169-174
Number of pages6
Edition1
ISBN (Print)978098032750
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

zoology
student
climate change
fieldwork
fauna
ecosystem
programme
effect
project

Cite this

Burgin, S., & Ross, P. (2012). Study of climate change and field research in zoology: Are they compatible with research student training programs? In Wildlife & climate change: Towards robust conservation strategies for Australian fauna (1 ed., pp. 169-174). New South Wales: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales. https://doi.org/10.7882/FS.2012.023
Burgin, Shelley ; Ross, Pauline. / Study of climate change and field research in zoology : Are they compatible with research student training programs?. Wildlife & climate change: Towards robust conservation strategies for Australian fauna. 1. ed. New South Wales : Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, 2012. pp. 169-174
@inbook{d1a296505dd84dbfb6c2d9e2f9479320,
title = "Study of climate change and field research in zoology: Are they compatible with research student training programs?",
abstract = "Biological diversity in Australia has been dwindling, even without the full onslaught of climate change with the anticipated decrease in numbers of species, communities and effects on associated ecosystems. This makes the impacts of climate change attractive for students undertaking research training in field biology in undergraduate and graduate zoology programs. The projects undertaken by such students are, of necessity, short-term and typically vary between several months and two years of field work. In this paper we consider if such projects are compatible with studying the effects of climate change on Australian native fauna. We conclude that there are limited opportunities for explicit outcomes; however, the research is valuable in a broader context of underpinning longer term research.",
author = "Shelley Burgin and Pauline Ross",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.7882/FS.2012.023",
language = "English",
isbn = "978098032750",
pages = "169--174",
booktitle = "Wildlife & climate change",
publisher = "Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales",
address = "Australia",
edition = "1",

}

Burgin, S & Ross, P 2012, Study of climate change and field research in zoology: Are they compatible with research student training programs? in Wildlife & climate change: Towards robust conservation strategies for Australian fauna. 1 edn, Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, New South Wales, pp. 169-174. https://doi.org/10.7882/FS.2012.023

Study of climate change and field research in zoology : Are they compatible with research student training programs? / Burgin, Shelley; Ross, Pauline.

Wildlife & climate change: Towards robust conservation strategies for Australian fauna. 1. ed. New South Wales : Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, 2012. p. 169-174.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Study of climate change and field research in zoology

T2 - Are they compatible with research student training programs?

AU - Burgin, Shelley

AU - Ross, Pauline

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Biological diversity in Australia has been dwindling, even without the full onslaught of climate change with the anticipated decrease in numbers of species, communities and effects on associated ecosystems. This makes the impacts of climate change attractive for students undertaking research training in field biology in undergraduate and graduate zoology programs. The projects undertaken by such students are, of necessity, short-term and typically vary between several months and two years of field work. In this paper we consider if such projects are compatible with studying the effects of climate change on Australian native fauna. We conclude that there are limited opportunities for explicit outcomes; however, the research is valuable in a broader context of underpinning longer term research.

AB - Biological diversity in Australia has been dwindling, even without the full onslaught of climate change with the anticipated decrease in numbers of species, communities and effects on associated ecosystems. This makes the impacts of climate change attractive for students undertaking research training in field biology in undergraduate and graduate zoology programs. The projects undertaken by such students are, of necessity, short-term and typically vary between several months and two years of field work. In this paper we consider if such projects are compatible with studying the effects of climate change on Australian native fauna. We conclude that there are limited opportunities for explicit outcomes; however, the research is valuable in a broader context of underpinning longer term research.

U2 - 10.7882/FS.2012.023

DO - 10.7882/FS.2012.023

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978098032750

SP - 169

EP - 174

BT - Wildlife & climate change

PB - Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales

CY - New South Wales

ER -

Burgin S, Ross P. Study of climate change and field research in zoology: Are they compatible with research student training programs? In Wildlife & climate change: Towards robust conservation strategies for Australian fauna. 1 ed. New South Wales: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales. 2012. p. 169-174 https://doi.org/10.7882/FS.2012.023