Spatially-defined motor deficits in people with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome

Emily J Reid, Felicity A Braithwaite, Sarah B Wallwork, Daniel Harvie, K Jane Chalmers, Charles Spence, Alberto Gallace, G Lorimer Moseley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Spatially-defined disruption of autonomic and sensory function has been identified in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). This study aimed to determine whether motor performance is also disrupted in a spatially-defined manner in people with CRPS.

METHODS: Thirteen people with CRPS type 1 of the upper limb participated in two motor experiments. In Experiment 1 participants performed a circle drawing task that primarily tested motor accuracy. In Experiment 2 participants performed a button pressing task that tested motor co-ordination. In both experiments the motor tasks were performed with either hand (affected or healthy), and on either side of the body midline - that is, on the affected side of space or healthy side of space.

RESULTS: There was a main effect of both Limb and Side for the motor tasks. In Experiment 1, motor accuracy for the circle drawing task was poorer when participants used their affected hand than when they used their healthy one (p < .001), and when the task was performed on the affected side of their body midline than when it was performed on the healthy side (p < .001). In Experiment 2, motor co-ordination for the button pressing task was poorer when participants used their affected hand than when they used their healthy one (p < .001), and when the task was performed on the affected side of the midline (p < .001), as compared to the healthy side of the midline.

CONCLUSIONS: Unilateral CRPS is associated with a spatially-defined disruption of motor performance. Participants perform worse when the task is performed on the affected side of the body midline, regardless of whether they use their affected or healthy hand.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCortex
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Complex Regional Pain Syndromes
Hand
Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy
Upper Extremity
Extremities

Cite this

Reid, E. J., Braithwaite, F. A., Wallwork, S. B., Harvie, D., Chalmers, K. J., Spence, C., ... Moseley, G. L. (2017). Spatially-defined motor deficits in people with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome. Cortex. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2017.06.024
Reid, Emily J ; Braithwaite, Felicity A ; Wallwork, Sarah B ; Harvie, Daniel ; Chalmers, K Jane ; Spence, Charles ; Gallace, Alberto ; Moseley, G Lorimer. / Spatially-defined motor deficits in people with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome. In: Cortex. 2017.
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title = "Spatially-defined motor deficits in people with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Spatially-defined disruption of autonomic and sensory function has been identified in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). This study aimed to determine whether motor performance is also disrupted in a spatially-defined manner in people with CRPS.METHODS: Thirteen people with CRPS type 1 of the upper limb participated in two motor experiments. In Experiment 1 participants performed a circle drawing task that primarily tested motor accuracy. In Experiment 2 participants performed a button pressing task that tested motor co-ordination. In both experiments the motor tasks were performed with either hand (affected or healthy), and on either side of the body midline - that is, on the affected side of space or healthy side of space.RESULTS: There was a main effect of both Limb and Side for the motor tasks. In Experiment 1, motor accuracy for the circle drawing task was poorer when participants used their affected hand than when they used their healthy one (p < .001), and when the task was performed on the affected side of their body midline than when it was performed on the healthy side (p < .001). In Experiment 2, motor co-ordination for the button pressing task was poorer when participants used their affected hand than when they used their healthy one (p < .001), and when the task was performed on the affected side of the midline (p < .001), as compared to the healthy side of the midline.CONCLUSIONS: Unilateral CRPS is associated with a spatially-defined disruption of motor performance. Participants perform worse when the task is performed on the affected side of the body midline, regardless of whether they use their affected or healthy hand.",
author = "Reid, {Emily J} and Braithwaite, {Felicity A} and Wallwork, {Sarah B} and Daniel Harvie and Chalmers, {K Jane} and Charles Spence and Alberto Gallace and Moseley, {G Lorimer}",
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Reid, EJ, Braithwaite, FA, Wallwork, SB, Harvie, D, Chalmers, KJ, Spence, C, Gallace, A & Moseley, GL 2017, 'Spatially-defined motor deficits in people with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome' Cortex. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2017.06.024

Spatially-defined motor deficits in people with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome. / Reid, Emily J; Braithwaite, Felicity A; Wallwork, Sarah B; Harvie, Daniel; Chalmers, K Jane; Spence, Charles; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G Lorimer.

In: Cortex, 14.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Spatially-defined motor deficits in people with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome

AU - Reid, Emily J

AU - Braithwaite, Felicity A

AU - Wallwork, Sarah B

AU - Harvie, Daniel

AU - Chalmers, K Jane

AU - Spence, Charles

AU - Gallace, Alberto

AU - Moseley, G Lorimer

N1 - Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PY - 2017/7/14

Y1 - 2017/7/14

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Spatially-defined disruption of autonomic and sensory function has been identified in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). This study aimed to determine whether motor performance is also disrupted in a spatially-defined manner in people with CRPS.METHODS: Thirteen people with CRPS type 1 of the upper limb participated in two motor experiments. In Experiment 1 participants performed a circle drawing task that primarily tested motor accuracy. In Experiment 2 participants performed a button pressing task that tested motor co-ordination. In both experiments the motor tasks were performed with either hand (affected or healthy), and on either side of the body midline - that is, on the affected side of space or healthy side of space.RESULTS: There was a main effect of both Limb and Side for the motor tasks. In Experiment 1, motor accuracy for the circle drawing task was poorer when participants used their affected hand than when they used their healthy one (p < .001), and when the task was performed on the affected side of their body midline than when it was performed on the healthy side (p < .001). In Experiment 2, motor co-ordination for the button pressing task was poorer when participants used their affected hand than when they used their healthy one (p < .001), and when the task was performed on the affected side of the midline (p < .001), as compared to the healthy side of the midline.CONCLUSIONS: Unilateral CRPS is associated with a spatially-defined disruption of motor performance. Participants perform worse when the task is performed on the affected side of the body midline, regardless of whether they use their affected or healthy hand.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Spatially-defined disruption of autonomic and sensory function has been identified in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). This study aimed to determine whether motor performance is also disrupted in a spatially-defined manner in people with CRPS.METHODS: Thirteen people with CRPS type 1 of the upper limb participated in two motor experiments. In Experiment 1 participants performed a circle drawing task that primarily tested motor accuracy. In Experiment 2 participants performed a button pressing task that tested motor co-ordination. In both experiments the motor tasks were performed with either hand (affected or healthy), and on either side of the body midline - that is, on the affected side of space or healthy side of space.RESULTS: There was a main effect of both Limb and Side for the motor tasks. In Experiment 1, motor accuracy for the circle drawing task was poorer when participants used their affected hand than when they used their healthy one (p < .001), and when the task was performed on the affected side of their body midline than when it was performed on the healthy side (p < .001). In Experiment 2, motor co-ordination for the button pressing task was poorer when participants used their affected hand than when they used their healthy one (p < .001), and when the task was performed on the affected side of the midline (p < .001), as compared to the healthy side of the midline.CONCLUSIONS: Unilateral CRPS is associated with a spatially-defined disruption of motor performance. Participants perform worse when the task is performed on the affected side of the body midline, regardless of whether they use their affected or healthy hand.

U2 - 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.06.024

DO - 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.06.024

M3 - Article

JO - Cortex

JF - Cortex

SN - 0010-9452

ER -

Reid EJ, Braithwaite FA, Wallwork SB, Harvie D, Chalmers KJ, Spence C et al. Spatially-defined motor deficits in people with unilateral complex regional pain syndrome. Cortex. 2017 Jul 14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2017.06.024