Socioeconomic Position and Reproduction: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

N. Holowko, M. Jones, L. Tooth, I. Koupil, G. D. Mishra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of socioeconomic position (SEP) with reproductive outcomes among Australian women.

METHODS: Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health's (population-based cohort study) 1973-1978 cohort were used (N = 6899, aged 37-42 years in 2015). The association of SEP (childhood and own, multiple indicators) with age at first birth, birth-to-pregnancy (BTP) intervals and total number of children was analysed using multinomial logistic regression.

RESULTS: 14% of women had their first birth aged < 24 years. 29% of multiparous women had a BTP interval within the WHO recommendation (18-27 months). Women with a low SEP had increased odds of a first birth < 24 years: low (OR 7.0: 95% C.I. 5.3, 9.3) or intermediate education (OR 3.8: 2.8, 5.1); living in rural (OR 1.8: 1.5, 2.2) or remote (OR 2.1: 1.7, 2.7) areas; who found it sometimes (OR 1.8: 1.5, 2.2) or always difficult (OR 2.0: 1.6, 2.7) to manage on their income; and did not know their parent's education (OR 4.5: 3.2, 6.4). Low SEP was associated with having a much longer than recommended BTP interval.

CONCLUSION: As the first Australian study describing social differences in reproductive characteristics, these findings provide a base for reducing social inequalities in reproduction. Assisting adequate BTP spacing is important, particularly for women with existing elevated risks due to social disadvantage; including having a first birth < 24 years of age and a longer than recommended BTP interval. This includes reviewing services/access to postnatal support, free family planning/contraception clinics, and improved family policies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1713-1724
Number of pages12
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume22
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Birth Intervals
Women's Health
Birth Order
Reproduction
Longitudinal Studies
Parturition
Family Planning Policy
Education
Family Planning Services
Contraception
Cohort Studies
Parents
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Population

Cite this

@article{476f6e654ae94aa5959cbf0f2698b8df,
title = "Socioeconomic Position and Reproduction: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of socioeconomic position (SEP) with reproductive outcomes among Australian women.METHODS: Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health's (population-based cohort study) 1973-1978 cohort were used (N = 6899, aged 37-42 years in 2015). The association of SEP (childhood and own, multiple indicators) with age at first birth, birth-to-pregnancy (BTP) intervals and total number of children was analysed using multinomial logistic regression.RESULTS: 14{\%} of women had their first birth aged < 24 years. 29{\%} of multiparous women had a BTP interval within the WHO recommendation (18-27 months). Women with a low SEP had increased odds of a first birth < 24 years: low (OR 7.0: 95{\%} C.I. 5.3, 9.3) or intermediate education (OR 3.8: 2.8, 5.1); living in rural (OR 1.8: 1.5, 2.2) or remote (OR 2.1: 1.7, 2.7) areas; who found it sometimes (OR 1.8: 1.5, 2.2) or always difficult (OR 2.0: 1.6, 2.7) to manage on their income; and did not know their parent's education (OR 4.5: 3.2, 6.4). Low SEP was associated with having a much longer than recommended BTP interval.CONCLUSION: As the first Australian study describing social differences in reproductive characteristics, these findings provide a base for reducing social inequalities in reproduction. Assisting adequate BTP spacing is important, particularly for women with existing elevated risks due to social disadvantage; including having a first birth < 24 years of age and a longer than recommended BTP interval. This includes reviewing services/access to postnatal support, free family planning/contraception clinics, and improved family policies.",
author = "N. Holowko and M. Jones and L. Tooth and I. Koupil and Mishra, {G. D.}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s10995-018-2567-1",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "1713--1724",
journal = "Maternal and Child Health Journal",
issn = "1092-7875",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "12",

}

Socioeconomic Position and Reproduction : Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. / Holowko, N.; Jones, M.; Tooth, L.; Koupil, I.; Mishra, G. D.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 22, No. 12, 12.2018, p. 1713-1724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socioeconomic Position and Reproduction

T2 - Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

AU - Holowko, N.

AU - Jones, M.

AU - Tooth, L.

AU - Koupil, I.

AU - Mishra, G. D.

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of socioeconomic position (SEP) with reproductive outcomes among Australian women.METHODS: Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health's (population-based cohort study) 1973-1978 cohort were used (N = 6899, aged 37-42 years in 2015). The association of SEP (childhood and own, multiple indicators) with age at first birth, birth-to-pregnancy (BTP) intervals and total number of children was analysed using multinomial logistic regression.RESULTS: 14% of women had their first birth aged < 24 years. 29% of multiparous women had a BTP interval within the WHO recommendation (18-27 months). Women with a low SEP had increased odds of a first birth < 24 years: low (OR 7.0: 95% C.I. 5.3, 9.3) or intermediate education (OR 3.8: 2.8, 5.1); living in rural (OR 1.8: 1.5, 2.2) or remote (OR 2.1: 1.7, 2.7) areas; who found it sometimes (OR 1.8: 1.5, 2.2) or always difficult (OR 2.0: 1.6, 2.7) to manage on their income; and did not know their parent's education (OR 4.5: 3.2, 6.4). Low SEP was associated with having a much longer than recommended BTP interval.CONCLUSION: As the first Australian study describing social differences in reproductive characteristics, these findings provide a base for reducing social inequalities in reproduction. Assisting adequate BTP spacing is important, particularly for women with existing elevated risks due to social disadvantage; including having a first birth < 24 years of age and a longer than recommended BTP interval. This includes reviewing services/access to postnatal support, free family planning/contraception clinics, and improved family policies.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of socioeconomic position (SEP) with reproductive outcomes among Australian women.METHODS: Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health's (population-based cohort study) 1973-1978 cohort were used (N = 6899, aged 37-42 years in 2015). The association of SEP (childhood and own, multiple indicators) with age at first birth, birth-to-pregnancy (BTP) intervals and total number of children was analysed using multinomial logistic regression.RESULTS: 14% of women had their first birth aged < 24 years. 29% of multiparous women had a BTP interval within the WHO recommendation (18-27 months). Women with a low SEP had increased odds of a first birth < 24 years: low (OR 7.0: 95% C.I. 5.3, 9.3) or intermediate education (OR 3.8: 2.8, 5.1); living in rural (OR 1.8: 1.5, 2.2) or remote (OR 2.1: 1.7, 2.7) areas; who found it sometimes (OR 1.8: 1.5, 2.2) or always difficult (OR 2.0: 1.6, 2.7) to manage on their income; and did not know their parent's education (OR 4.5: 3.2, 6.4). Low SEP was associated with having a much longer than recommended BTP interval.CONCLUSION: As the first Australian study describing social differences in reproductive characteristics, these findings provide a base for reducing social inequalities in reproduction. Assisting adequate BTP spacing is important, particularly for women with existing elevated risks due to social disadvantage; including having a first birth < 24 years of age and a longer than recommended BTP interval. This includes reviewing services/access to postnatal support, free family planning/contraception clinics, and improved family policies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049148677&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10995-018-2567-1

DO - 10.1007/s10995-018-2567-1

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 1713

EP - 1724

JO - Maternal and Child Health Journal

JF - Maternal and Child Health Journal

SN - 1092-7875

IS - 12

ER -