Snatch trajectory of elite level girevoy (Kettlebell) sport athletes and its implications to strength and conditioning coaching

James A. Ross, Cameron J. Wilson, Justin W L Keogh, Kuok Wai Ho, Christian Lorenzen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
35 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Girevoy sport (GS) has developed only recently in the West, resulting in a paucity of English scientific literature available. The aim was to document kettlebell trajectory of GS athletes performing the kettlebell snatch. Four elite GS athletes (age = 29-47 years, body mass = 68.3-108.1 kg, height 1.72-1.89 m) completed one set of 16 repetitions with a 32.1 kg kettlebell. Trajectory was captured with the VICON motion analysis system (250 Hz) and analysed with VICON Nexus (1.7.1). The kettlebell followed a 'C' shape trajectory in the sagittal plane. Mean peak velocity in the upwards phase was 4.03 ± 0.20 m s-1, compared to 3.70 ± 0.30 m s-1 during the downwards phase, and mean radial error across the sagittal and frontal planes was 0.022 ± 0.006 m. Low error in the movement suggests consistent trajectory is important to reduce extraneous movement and improve efficiency. While the kettlebell snatch and swing both require large anterior-posterior motion, the snatch requires the kettlebell to be held stationary overhead. Therefore, a different coaching application is required to that of a barbell snatch.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-452
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Science and Coaching
Volume10
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2015

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abstract = "Girevoy sport (GS) has developed only recently in the West, resulting in a paucity of English scientific literature available. The aim was to document kettlebell trajectory of GS athletes performing the kettlebell snatch. Four elite GS athletes (age = 29-47 years, body mass = 68.3-108.1 kg, height 1.72-1.89 m) completed one set of 16 repetitions with a 32.1 kg kettlebell. Trajectory was captured with the VICON motion analysis system (250 Hz) and analysed with VICON Nexus (1.7.1). The kettlebell followed a 'C' shape trajectory in the sagittal plane. Mean peak velocity in the upwards phase was 4.03 ± 0.20 m s-1, compared to 3.70 ± 0.30 m s-1 during the downwards phase, and mean radial error across the sagittal and frontal planes was 0.022 ± 0.006 m. Low error in the movement suggests consistent trajectory is important to reduce extraneous movement and improve efficiency. While the kettlebell snatch and swing both require large anterior-posterior motion, the snatch requires the kettlebell to be held stationary overhead. Therefore, a different coaching application is required to that of a barbell snatch.",
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Snatch trajectory of elite level girevoy (Kettlebell) sport athletes and its implications to strength and conditioning coaching. / Ross, James A.; Wilson, Cameron J.; Keogh, Justin W L; Ho, Kuok Wai; Lorenzen, Christian.

In: International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching, Vol. 10, No. 2-3, 01.06.2015, p. 439-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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