Sizing up package size effects

Natalina Zlatevska, Marilyn Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Repackaging food into smaller servings has become a popular strategy among foodmarketers but recent research surprisingly suggests that smaller packs may lead tomore food consumed. The aim of the present research is to explore the usefulness ofusing smaller package sizes as a tool for monitoring consumption. In particular, weexplore this in situations here distractions are present. We find that smaller packagesizes are beneficial for dieters, though usage needs to be in circumstances where nodistractions are present. In situations where distractions may exist, dieters are betteroff consuming from traditional larger sized packs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)649-650
Number of pages6
JournalAdvances in Consumer Research
Volume37
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Food
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Sizing
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Zlatevska, N., & Jones, M. (2010). Sizing up package size effects. Advances in Consumer Research, 37, 649-650.
Zlatevska, Natalina ; Jones, Marilyn. / Sizing up package size effects. In: Advances in Consumer Research. 2010 ; Vol. 37. pp. 649-650.
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Zlatevska, N & Jones, M 2010, 'Sizing up package size effects' Advances in Consumer Research, vol. 37, pp. 649-650.

Sizing up package size effects. / Zlatevska, Natalina; Jones, Marilyn.

In: Advances in Consumer Research, Vol. 37, 2010, p. 649-650.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Sizing up package size effects

AU - Zlatevska, Natalina

AU - Jones, Marilyn

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AB - Repackaging food into smaller servings has become a popular strategy among foodmarketers but recent research surprisingly suggests that smaller packs may lead tomore food consumed. The aim of the present research is to explore the usefulness ofusing smaller package sizes as a tool for monitoring consumption. In particular, weexplore this in situations here distractions are present. We find that smaller packagesizes are beneficial for dieters, though usage needs to be in circumstances where nodistractions are present. In situations where distractions may exist, dieters are betteroff consuming from traditional larger sized packs.

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Zlatevska N, Jones M. Sizing up package size effects. Advances in Consumer Research. 2010;37:649-650.