Short-term body weight fluctuations in older well-hydrated hospitalised patients

A Vivanti, Lily Yu, M Palmer, L Dakin, J Sun, K Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The usual daily weight fluctuations of well-hydrated older hospitalised people have not been documented internationally. To date, dehydration assessments based on a short-term body weight change defined as >2% have been drawn from healthy population data. The present pilot study aimed to describe usual body weight fluctuation at the same time of day over a 3-day time frame in well-hydrated older hospitalised adults.

METHODS: An observational study of non-acute inpatients (n = 10) admitted to a Geriatric and Rehabilitation Unit, aged ≥60 years, assessed as well-hydrated, mobile, non-amputee and without conditions that influenced fluid status, was conducted. Participants were weighed hourly over a 9-h period for 3 days. Food and fluid intake, clothing items added or removed, and urine and faecal output were recorded.

RESULTS: Weight fluctuation for each participant [mean (SD) 80.2 (4.2) years; male 60.0%, n = 10] over 3 days ranged from 1.1% to 3.6%. Over 3 days, 40.0% (4/10) of participants had weight fluctuations of >2% and 20% (2/10) had weight fluctuations of >3%. Time of weigh-in accounted for 99.8% of the variation in weight fluctuation (P < 0.05), with the lowest fluctuations observed when weights were compared at the same time each day (≤0.4 kg).

CONCLUSIONS: Weights recorded at the same time daily had the greatest accuracy. Given that the range 1.1-3.6% was within normal weight fluctuations for well-hydrated older hospitalised participants, the weight change indicative of dehydration remains to be established in this setting but appears greater than conventionally used figures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-35
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Body Weight
Weights and Measures
Dehydration
Body Weight Changes
Clothing
Geriatrics
Observational Studies
Inpatients
Rehabilitation
Eating
Urine
Population

Cite this

Vivanti, A ; Yu, Lily ; Palmer, M ; Dakin, L ; Sun, J ; Campbell, K. / Short-term body weight fluctuations in older well-hydrated hospitalised patients. In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 2013 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 429-35.
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title = "Short-term body weight fluctuations in older well-hydrated hospitalised patients",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The usual daily weight fluctuations of well-hydrated older hospitalised people have not been documented internationally. To date, dehydration assessments based on a short-term body weight change defined as >2{\%} have been drawn from healthy population data. The present pilot study aimed to describe usual body weight fluctuation at the same time of day over a 3-day time frame in well-hydrated older hospitalised adults.METHODS: An observational study of non-acute inpatients (n = 10) admitted to a Geriatric and Rehabilitation Unit, aged ≥60 years, assessed as well-hydrated, mobile, non-amputee and without conditions that influenced fluid status, was conducted. Participants were weighed hourly over a 9-h period for 3 days. Food and fluid intake, clothing items added or removed, and urine and faecal output were recorded.RESULTS: Weight fluctuation for each participant [mean (SD) 80.2 (4.2) years; male 60.0{\%}, n = 10] over 3 days ranged from 1.1{\%} to 3.6{\%}. Over 3 days, 40.0{\%} (4/10) of participants had weight fluctuations of >2{\%} and 20{\%} (2/10) had weight fluctuations of >3{\%}. Time of weigh-in accounted for 99.8{\%} of the variation in weight fluctuation (P < 0.05), with the lowest fluctuations observed when weights were compared at the same time each day (≤0.4 kg).CONCLUSIONS: Weights recorded at the same time daily had the greatest accuracy. Given that the range 1.1-3.6{\%} was within normal weight fluctuations for well-hydrated older hospitalised participants, the weight change indicative of dehydration remains to be established in this setting but appears greater than conventionally used figures.",
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Short-term body weight fluctuations in older well-hydrated hospitalised patients. / Vivanti, A; Yu, Lily; Palmer, M; Dakin, L; Sun, J; Campbell, K.

In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 26, No. 5, 22.03.2013, p. 429-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Short-term body weight fluctuations in older well-hydrated hospitalised patients

AU - Vivanti, A

AU - Yu, Lily

AU - Palmer, M

AU - Dakin, L

AU - Sun, J

AU - Campbell, K

N1 - © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

PY - 2013/3/22

Y1 - 2013/3/22

N2 - BACKGROUND: The usual daily weight fluctuations of well-hydrated older hospitalised people have not been documented internationally. To date, dehydration assessments based on a short-term body weight change defined as >2% have been drawn from healthy population data. The present pilot study aimed to describe usual body weight fluctuation at the same time of day over a 3-day time frame in well-hydrated older hospitalised adults.METHODS: An observational study of non-acute inpatients (n = 10) admitted to a Geriatric and Rehabilitation Unit, aged ≥60 years, assessed as well-hydrated, mobile, non-amputee and without conditions that influenced fluid status, was conducted. Participants were weighed hourly over a 9-h period for 3 days. Food and fluid intake, clothing items added or removed, and urine and faecal output were recorded.RESULTS: Weight fluctuation for each participant [mean (SD) 80.2 (4.2) years; male 60.0%, n = 10] over 3 days ranged from 1.1% to 3.6%. Over 3 days, 40.0% (4/10) of participants had weight fluctuations of >2% and 20% (2/10) had weight fluctuations of >3%. Time of weigh-in accounted for 99.8% of the variation in weight fluctuation (P < 0.05), with the lowest fluctuations observed when weights were compared at the same time each day (≤0.4 kg).CONCLUSIONS: Weights recorded at the same time daily had the greatest accuracy. Given that the range 1.1-3.6% was within normal weight fluctuations for well-hydrated older hospitalised participants, the weight change indicative of dehydration remains to be established in this setting but appears greater than conventionally used figures.

AB - BACKGROUND: The usual daily weight fluctuations of well-hydrated older hospitalised people have not been documented internationally. To date, dehydration assessments based on a short-term body weight change defined as >2% have been drawn from healthy population data. The present pilot study aimed to describe usual body weight fluctuation at the same time of day over a 3-day time frame in well-hydrated older hospitalised adults.METHODS: An observational study of non-acute inpatients (n = 10) admitted to a Geriatric and Rehabilitation Unit, aged ≥60 years, assessed as well-hydrated, mobile, non-amputee and without conditions that influenced fluid status, was conducted. Participants were weighed hourly over a 9-h period for 3 days. Food and fluid intake, clothing items added or removed, and urine and faecal output were recorded.RESULTS: Weight fluctuation for each participant [mean (SD) 80.2 (4.2) years; male 60.0%, n = 10] over 3 days ranged from 1.1% to 3.6%. Over 3 days, 40.0% (4/10) of participants had weight fluctuations of >2% and 20% (2/10) had weight fluctuations of >3%. Time of weigh-in accounted for 99.8% of the variation in weight fluctuation (P < 0.05), with the lowest fluctuations observed when weights were compared at the same time each day (≤0.4 kg).CONCLUSIONS: Weights recorded at the same time daily had the greatest accuracy. Given that the range 1.1-3.6% was within normal weight fluctuations for well-hydrated older hospitalised participants, the weight change indicative of dehydration remains to be established in this setting but appears greater than conventionally used figures.

U2 - 10.1111/jhn.12034

DO - 10.1111/jhn.12034

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 429

EP - 435

JO - Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

JF - Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

SN - 0952-3871

IS - 5

ER -