Self-reported sitting time is not associated with incidence of cardiovascular disease in a population-based cohort of mid-aged women

Gerrie Cor M. Herber-Gast, Caroline A. Jackson*, Gita D. Mishra, Wendy J. Brown

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In Westernised societies adults are increasingly spending many hours each day in sedentary, low energy expenditure activities such as sitting. Although there is growing evidence on the relationship between television/screen time and increased cardiovascular disease mortality, very little is known about the association between total sitting time (in different domains) and cardiovascular disease incidence. We investigated this in a population-based cohort of mid-aged women in Australia.

Findings: Data were from 6154 participants in the 1946-51 birth cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Survival analysis was used to determine the association between self-reported sitting time and cardiovascular disease incidence, determined through hospital diagnoses and cause of death data. During a mean (± SD) follow-up time of 9.9 ± 1.2 years, 177 cases of cardiovascular disease occurred. Mean sitting time (± SD) was 5.4 ± 2.6 hours a day. Sitting time was not associated with incident cardiovascular disease (adjusted hazard ratio 0.97, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.03). We found no interaction between physical activity and sitting time and cardiovascular disease.

Conclusions: In mid-aged women sitting time does not appear to be associated with cardiovascular disease incidence. These findings are contrary to expectations, given the growing evidence of a relationship between sitting time and cardiovascular disease mortality. Research in this area is scarce and additional studies are needed to confirm or refute these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number55
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 May 2013
Externally publishedYes

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