Self-reported load carriage injuries in Australian regular army soldiers

Rob Marc Orr, Rodney R Pope, Julia Coyle, Vanerina Johnston

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Question: What injury risks are associated with load carriage in
Australian soldiers?
Design: Online survey
Participants: Australian Regular Army soldiers from selected Corps with
high exposure to load carriage.
Intervention: Exposure to Army load carriage tasks
Outcome Measures: Self-reported injury incidence, types, body sites and
sources, associated with military load carriage
Results: Of 338 respondents, 34% reported at least one load carriage
injury over their military career (9.4±7.4 years of service) of which 8% were
female and 92% were male. Female soldiers reported 1.21 (CI 0.71 to 2.04)
times as many injury incidents per capita as males. Of the 42% of injured
soldiers who reported sustaining more than one injury, 43% reinjured the
same body site. The majority of injuries (61%) affected the lower limbs,
with bones and joints the most frequently injured body structures (39%).
Endurance marching was the activity accounting for most (38%) injuries.
Conclusions: Occupational load carriage is a source of soldier injuries.
Once injured, soldiers are at high risk of subsequent load carriage injury.
The body sites and natures of self-reported injuries are akin to those of
formally reported injuries and those reported by other military forces.
Key Practice Points:
• Soldiers are required to carry loads as part of their occupation and these
loads may predispose them to injuries
• Once injured soldiers are at an increased risk of subsequent load
carriage injuries
• When treating a soldier for musculoskeletal injuries, developing load
carriage resilience prior to return to work is a priority.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventThe Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015: Connect - Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 3 Oct 20156 Oct 2015
Conference number: 2015
http://www.physiotherapy.asn.au/Conference2015

Conference

ConferenceThe Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period3/10/156/10/15
Internet address

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Military Personnel
Wounds and Injuries
Somatotypes
Return to Work
Occupations
Lower Extremity
Joints

Cite this

Orr, R. M., Pope, R. R., Coyle, J., & Johnston, V. (2015). Self-reported load carriage injuries in Australian regular army soldiers. The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.
Orr, Rob Marc ; Pope, Rodney R ; Coyle, Julia ; Johnston, Vanerina. / Self-reported load carriage injuries in Australian regular army soldiers. The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.
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abstract = "Question: What injury risks are associated with load carriage inAustralian soldiers?Design: Online surveyParticipants: Australian Regular Army soldiers from selected Corps withhigh exposure to load carriage.Intervention: Exposure to Army load carriage tasksOutcome Measures: Self-reported injury incidence, types, body sites andsources, associated with military load carriageResults: Of 338 respondents, 34{\%} reported at least one load carriageinjury over their military career (9.4±7.4 years of service) of which 8{\%} werefemale and 92{\%} were male. Female soldiers reported 1.21 (CI 0.71 to 2.04)times as many injury incidents per capita as males. Of the 42{\%} of injuredsoldiers who reported sustaining more than one injury, 43{\%} reinjured thesame body site. The majority of injuries (61{\%}) affected the lower limbs,with bones and joints the most frequently injured body structures (39{\%}).Endurance marching was the activity accounting for most (38{\%}) injuries.Conclusions: Occupational load carriage is a source of soldier injuries.Once injured, soldiers are at high risk of subsequent load carriage injury.The body sites and natures of self-reported injuries are akin to those offormally reported injuries and those reported by other military forces.Key Practice Points:• Soldiers are required to carry loads as part of their occupation and theseloads may predispose them to injuries• Once injured soldiers are at an increased risk of subsequent loadcarriage injuries• When treating a soldier for musculoskeletal injuries, developing loadcarriage resilience prior to return to work is a priority.",
author = "Orr, {Rob Marc} and Pope, {Rodney R} and Julia Coyle and Vanerina Johnston",
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language = "English",
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Orr, RM, Pope, RR, Coyle, J & Johnston, V 2015, 'Self-reported load carriage injuries in Australian regular army soldiers' The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia, 3/10/15 - 6/10/15, .

Self-reported load carriage injuries in Australian regular army soldiers. / Orr, Rob Marc; Pope, Rodney R; Coyle, Julia; Johnston, Vanerina.

2015. The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Self-reported load carriage injuries in Australian regular army soldiers

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Pope, Rodney R

AU - Coyle, Julia

AU - Johnston, Vanerina

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Question: What injury risks are associated with load carriage inAustralian soldiers?Design: Online surveyParticipants: Australian Regular Army soldiers from selected Corps withhigh exposure to load carriage.Intervention: Exposure to Army load carriage tasksOutcome Measures: Self-reported injury incidence, types, body sites andsources, associated with military load carriageResults: Of 338 respondents, 34% reported at least one load carriageinjury over their military career (9.4±7.4 years of service) of which 8% werefemale and 92% were male. Female soldiers reported 1.21 (CI 0.71 to 2.04)times as many injury incidents per capita as males. Of the 42% of injuredsoldiers who reported sustaining more than one injury, 43% reinjured thesame body site. The majority of injuries (61%) affected the lower limbs,with bones and joints the most frequently injured body structures (39%).Endurance marching was the activity accounting for most (38%) injuries.Conclusions: Occupational load carriage is a source of soldier injuries.Once injured, soldiers are at high risk of subsequent load carriage injury.The body sites and natures of self-reported injuries are akin to those offormally reported injuries and those reported by other military forces.Key Practice Points:• Soldiers are required to carry loads as part of their occupation and theseloads may predispose them to injuries• Once injured soldiers are at an increased risk of subsequent loadcarriage injuries• When treating a soldier for musculoskeletal injuries, developing loadcarriage resilience prior to return to work is a priority.

AB - Question: What injury risks are associated with load carriage inAustralian soldiers?Design: Online surveyParticipants: Australian Regular Army soldiers from selected Corps withhigh exposure to load carriage.Intervention: Exposure to Army load carriage tasksOutcome Measures: Self-reported injury incidence, types, body sites andsources, associated with military load carriageResults: Of 338 respondents, 34% reported at least one load carriageinjury over their military career (9.4±7.4 years of service) of which 8% werefemale and 92% were male. Female soldiers reported 1.21 (CI 0.71 to 2.04)times as many injury incidents per capita as males. Of the 42% of injuredsoldiers who reported sustaining more than one injury, 43% reinjured thesame body site. The majority of injuries (61%) affected the lower limbs,with bones and joints the most frequently injured body structures (39%).Endurance marching was the activity accounting for most (38%) injuries.Conclusions: Occupational load carriage is a source of soldier injuries.Once injured, soldiers are at high risk of subsequent load carriage injury.The body sites and natures of self-reported injuries are akin to those offormally reported injuries and those reported by other military forces.Key Practice Points:• Soldiers are required to carry loads as part of their occupation and theseloads may predispose them to injuries• Once injured soldiers are at an increased risk of subsequent loadcarriage injuries• When treating a soldier for musculoskeletal injuries, developing loadcarriage resilience prior to return to work is a priority.

M3 - Presentation

ER -

Orr RM, Pope RR, Coyle J, Johnston V. Self-reported load carriage injuries in Australian regular army soldiers. 2015. The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.