Self-assessed health status and neighborhood context

Scott Baum, Elizabeth Kendall, Sanjoti Parekh

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, there has been growing interest in the relationship between the characteristics of neighborhoods and the health and well-being of residents. The focus on neighborhood as a health determinant is based on the hypothesis that residing in a disadvantaged neighborhood can negatively influence health outcomes beyond the effect of individual characteristics. In this article, we examine three possible ways of measuring neighborhood socio-economic status, and how they each impact on self-reported health status beyond the effect contributed by individual-level factors. Using individual-level data from the Household Income and Labor Dynamics Australia survey combined with neighborhood-level (suburb) data, we tested the proposition that how one measures neighborhood socio-economic characteristics may provide an important new insight into understanding the links between individual-level outcomes and neighborhood-level characteristics. The findings from the analysis illustrate that although individual-level factors may be important to understanding health outcomes, how one accounts for neighborhood-level socio-economic status may be equally important. The findings suggest that in developing place-based health programs, policy makers need to account for the complex interactions between individual drivers and the potential complexities of accounting for neighborhood socio-economic status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-295
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Health Status
Economics
Health
Vulnerable Populations
Health Policy
Administrative Personnel

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Baum, Scott ; Kendall, Elizabeth ; Parekh, Sanjoti. / Self-assessed health status and neighborhood context. In: Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community. 2016 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 283-295.
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Self-assessed health status and neighborhood context. / Baum, Scott; Kendall, Elizabeth; Parekh, Sanjoti.

In: Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. 283-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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