Sarcopenia in older adults

Timothy Henwood, Justin W L Keogh, Michael Climstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

Abstract

Sarcopenia is a little acknowledged geriatric syndrome associated with significant health care and personal burden (Janssen et al 2004). Defined by an age associated loss in muscle mass and function (either muscle strength or physical performance), sarcopenia is a known precursor to later life disability (Cruz-Jentoft et al 2010). Across the lifespan, an adult can expect a 35% loss in muscle size and 50% loss in muscle strength that will significantly reduce their capacity to undertake activities of daily living, and increase their risk of falls due to reduced balance capacity and core strength (Bean et al 2002).
Original languageEnglish
Article number39
JournalAustralian nursing journal (July 1993)
Volume19
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

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Sarcopenia
Muscle Strength
Muscles
Activities of Daily Living
Geriatrics
Delivery of Health Care

Cite this

Henwood, T., Keogh, J. W. L., & Climstein, M. (2012). Sarcopenia in older adults. Australian nursing journal (July 1993), 19(9), [39].
Henwood, Timothy ; Keogh, Justin W L ; Climstein, Michael. / Sarcopenia in older adults. In: Australian nursing journal (July 1993). 2012 ; Vol. 19, No. 9.
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Henwood, T, Keogh, JWL & Climstein, M 2012, 'Sarcopenia in older adults' Australian nursing journal (July 1993), vol. 19, no. 9, 39.

Sarcopenia in older adults. / Henwood, Timothy; Keogh, Justin W L; Climstein, Michael.

In: Australian nursing journal (July 1993), Vol. 19, No. 9, 39, 03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

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AU - Climstein, Michael

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AB - Sarcopenia is a little acknowledged geriatric syndrome associated with significant health care and personal burden (Janssen et al 2004). Defined by an age associated loss in muscle mass and function (either muscle strength or physical performance), sarcopenia is a known precursor to later life disability (Cruz-Jentoft et al 2010). Across the lifespan, an adult can expect a 35% loss in muscle size and 50% loss in muscle strength that will significantly reduce their capacity to undertake activities of daily living, and increase their risk of falls due to reduced balance capacity and core strength (Bean et al 2002).

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