Runner's knowledge of their foot type: Do they really know?

Erik Hohmann, Peter Reaburn, Andreas Imhoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The use of correct individually selected running shoes may reduce the incidence of running injuries. However, the runner needs to be aware of their foot anatomy to ensure the " correct" footwear is chosen. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the individual runner's knowledge of their arch type to the arch index derived from a static footprint. Methods: We examined 92 recreational runners with a mean age of 35.4 ± 11.4 (12-63) years. A questionnaire was used to investigate the knowledge of the runners about arch height and overpronation. A clinical examination was undertaken using defined criteria and the arch index was analysed using weight-bearing footprints. Results: Forty-five runners (49%) identified their foot arch correctly. Eighteen of the 41 flat-arched runners (44%) identified their arch correctly. Twenty-four of the 48 normal-arched athletes (50%) identified their arch correctly. Three subjects with a high arch identified their arch correctly. Thirty-eight runners assessed themselves as overpronators; only four (11%) of these athletes were positively identified. Of the 34 athletes who did not categorize themselves as overpronators, four runners (12%) had clinical overpronation. Conclusion: The findings of this research suggest that runners possess poor knowledge of both their foot arch and dynamic pronation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-210
Number of pages6
JournalFoot
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Athletes
Foot
Pronation
Shoes
Weight-Bearing
Anatomy
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Hohmann, Erik ; Reaburn, Peter ; Imhoff, Andreas. / Runner's knowledge of their foot type : Do they really know?. In: Foot. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 205-210.
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title = "Runner's knowledge of their foot type: Do they really know?",
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Runner's knowledge of their foot type : Do they really know? / Hohmann, Erik; Reaburn, Peter; Imhoff, Andreas.

In: Foot, Vol. 22, No. 3, 09.2012, p. 205-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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