Routine use of clinical management guidelines in Australian general practice

Mark F. Harris, Jane Lloyd, Yordanka Krastev, Mahnaz Fanaian, Gawaine Powell Davies, Nick Zwar, Siaw Teng Liaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Significant gaps remain between recommendations of evidence-based guidelines and primary health care practice in Australia. This paper aims to evaluate factors associated with the use of guidelines reported by Australian GPs. Secondary analysis was performed on a survey of primary care practitioners which was conducted by the Commonwealth Fund in 2009: 1016 general practitioners responded in Australia (response rate 52%). Two-thirds of Australian GPs reported that they routinely used evidence-based treatment guidelines for the management of four conditions: diabetes, depression, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension - a higher proportion than in most other countries. Having non-medical staff educating patients about self-management, and a system of GP reminders to provide patients with test results or guideline-based intervention or screening tests, were associated with a higher probability of guidelines use. Older GP age was associated with lower probability of guideline usage. The negative association with age of the doctor may reflect a tendency to rely on experience rather than evidence-based guidelines. The association with greater use of reminders and self-management is consistent with the chronic illness model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-46
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian Journal of Primary Health
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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General Practice
Guidelines
Self Care
Primary Health Care
Reminder Systems
Evidence-Based Practice
Pulmonary Hypertension
General Practitioners
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Chronic Disease
Asthma

Cite this

Harris, M. F., Lloyd, J., Krastev, Y., Fanaian, M., Davies, G. P., Zwar, N., & Liaw, S. T. (2014). Routine use of clinical management guidelines in Australian general practice. Australian Journal of Primary Health, 20(1), 41-46. https://doi.org/10.1071/PY12078
Harris, Mark F. ; Lloyd, Jane ; Krastev, Yordanka ; Fanaian, Mahnaz ; Davies, Gawaine Powell ; Zwar, Nick ; Liaw, Siaw Teng. / Routine use of clinical management guidelines in Australian general practice. In: Australian Journal of Primary Health. 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 41-46.
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Harris, MF, Lloyd, J, Krastev, Y, Fanaian, M, Davies, GP, Zwar, N & Liaw, ST 2014, 'Routine use of clinical management guidelines in Australian general practice' Australian Journal of Primary Health, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 41-46. https://doi.org/10.1071/PY12078

Routine use of clinical management guidelines in Australian general practice. / Harris, Mark F.; Lloyd, Jane; Krastev, Yordanka; Fanaian, Mahnaz; Davies, Gawaine Powell; Zwar, Nick; Liaw, Siaw Teng.

In: Australian Journal of Primary Health, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 41-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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