Risk factors for acute and chronic injury in recreational and competitive surfers

James Furness, Wayne A Hing, J Walsh, J M Sheppard, Michael Climstein

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Questions: Are there age related differences in the incidence of acute injuries or the prevalence of chronic injuries for recreational and competitive surfers. Design: Retrospective observational study. Participants: A total of 1,348 participants completed an online survey consisting of three sections: demographics, acute and chronic injury. Results: Of 1,348 surfers (1,231 male, mean age 36.2 ±13.2, 117 female mean age 31.9 ±11.1), 708 (52.5%) suffered an acute injury whilst surfing in the preceding 12months. As expected those suffering an acute injury on average spent significantly (t=5.2, p<0.001) more time surfing (343.1 ±312.0 versus 263.1 ±259.9 hours/year) than those who were uninjured. Independent t tests revealed a significant difference (t=5.2, p<0.001) between age and incidence of acute injury with younger surfers (34.1 ±12.3 versus 37.8 ±13.6 years) more likely to sustain an acute injury in the previous twelve months. Of the 1,348 surfers, 477 (35.4%) suffered from a chronic injury caused or aggravated by surfing. Older surfers (39.3 ±12.0 vs. 33.9 ±13.3 years) were more likely to sustain a chronic injury (t=7.6, p<0.001) whilst surfing. Of interest there was no significant difference (t=0.38, p=0.11) between prevalence of chronic injury and hours spent surfing (309.6 ±272.0 versus 303.2 ±301.3 hours/year). Conclusion: This information aids in identifying surfers who are more at risk of acute and chronic injury. These findings reinforce the relevance of preventative surf specific conditioning (proprioceptive, strength and flexibility) exercises in at risk surfing sub-groups.Key practice points: Younger surfers were more at risk of suffering an acute injury (<35 years). Older surfers were more likely to suffer a chronic injury (>38 years). Acute injury was associated with increased hours surfing (>6.5 hours per week). Screening and surf specific conditioning exercises could be implemented for at risk sub-groups.
Key practice points:  Younger surfers were more at risk of suffering an acute injury (<35 years). Older surfers were more likely to suffer a chronic injury (>38 years).  Acute injury was associated with increased hours surfing (>6.5 hours per week).  Screening and surf specific conditioning exercises could be implemented for at risk subgroups. 
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013
EventAustralian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013: New Moves - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 17 Oct 201320 Oct 2013

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013
Abbreviated titleAPA Conference 2013
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period17/10/1320/10/13

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Wounds and Injuries
Observational Studies
Retrospective Studies
Demography
Incidence

Cite this

Furness, J., Hing, W. A., Walsh, J., Sheppard, J. M., & Climstein, M. (2013). Risk factors for acute and chronic injury in recreational and competitive surfers. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia.
Furness, James ; Hing, Wayne A ; Walsh, J ; Sheppard, J M ; Climstein, Michael. / Risk factors for acute and chronic injury in recreational and competitive surfers. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia.1 p.
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abstract = "Questions: Are there age related differences in the incidence of acute injuries or the prevalence of chronic injuries for recreational and competitive surfers. Design: Retrospective observational study. Participants: A total of 1,348 participants completed an online survey consisting of three sections: demographics, acute and chronic injury. Results: Of 1,348 surfers (1,231 male, mean age 36.2 ±13.2, 117 female mean age 31.9 ±11.1), 708 (52.5{\%}) suffered an acute injury whilst surfing in the preceding 12months. As expected those suffering an acute injury on average spent significantly (t=5.2, p<0.001) more time surfing (343.1 ±312.0 versus 263.1 ±259.9 hours/year) than those who were uninjured. Independent t tests revealed a significant difference (t=5.2, p<0.001) between age and incidence of acute injury with younger surfers (34.1 ±12.3 versus 37.8 ±13.6 years) more likely to sustain an acute injury in the previous twelve months. Of the 1,348 surfers, 477 (35.4{\%}) suffered from a chronic injury caused or aggravated by surfing. Older surfers (39.3 ±12.0 vs. 33.9 ±13.3 years) were more likely to sustain a chronic injury (t=7.6, p<0.001) whilst surfing. Of interest there was no significant difference (t=0.38, p=0.11) between prevalence of chronic injury and hours spent surfing (309.6 ±272.0 versus 303.2 ±301.3 hours/year). Conclusion: This information aids in identifying surfers who are more at risk of acute and chronic injury. These findings reinforce the relevance of preventative surf specific conditioning (proprioceptive, strength and flexibility) exercises in at risk surfing sub-groups.Key practice points: Younger surfers were more at risk of suffering an acute injury (<35 years). Older surfers were more likely to suffer a chronic injury (>38 years). Acute injury was associated with increased hours surfing (>6.5 hours per week). Screening and surf specific conditioning exercises could be implemented for at risk sub-groups.Key practice points:  Younger surfers were more at risk of suffering an acute injury (<35 years). Older surfers were more likely to suffer a chronic injury (>38 years).  Acute injury was associated with increased hours surfing (>6.5 hours per week).  Screening and surf specific conditioning exercises could be implemented for at risk subgroups. ",
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Furness, J, Hing, WA, Walsh, J, Sheppard, JM & Climstein, M 2013, 'Risk factors for acute and chronic injury in recreational and competitive surfers' Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia, 17/10/13 - 20/10/13, .

Risk factors for acute and chronic injury in recreational and competitive surfers. / Furness, James; Hing, Wayne A; Walsh, J; Sheppard, J M; Climstein, Michael.

2013. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Risk factors for acute and chronic injury in recreational and competitive surfers

AU - Furness, James

AU - Hing, Wayne A

AU - Walsh, J

AU - Sheppard, J M

AU - Climstein, Michael

PY - 2013/10

Y1 - 2013/10

N2 - Questions: Are there age related differences in the incidence of acute injuries or the prevalence of chronic injuries for recreational and competitive surfers. Design: Retrospective observational study. Participants: A total of 1,348 participants completed an online survey consisting of three sections: demographics, acute and chronic injury. Results: Of 1,348 surfers (1,231 male, mean age 36.2 ±13.2, 117 female mean age 31.9 ±11.1), 708 (52.5%) suffered an acute injury whilst surfing in the preceding 12months. As expected those suffering an acute injury on average spent significantly (t=5.2, p<0.001) more time surfing (343.1 ±312.0 versus 263.1 ±259.9 hours/year) than those who were uninjured. Independent t tests revealed a significant difference (t=5.2, p<0.001) between age and incidence of acute injury with younger surfers (34.1 ±12.3 versus 37.8 ±13.6 years) more likely to sustain an acute injury in the previous twelve months. Of the 1,348 surfers, 477 (35.4%) suffered from a chronic injury caused or aggravated by surfing. Older surfers (39.3 ±12.0 vs. 33.9 ±13.3 years) were more likely to sustain a chronic injury (t=7.6, p<0.001) whilst surfing. Of interest there was no significant difference (t=0.38, p=0.11) between prevalence of chronic injury and hours spent surfing (309.6 ±272.0 versus 303.2 ±301.3 hours/year). Conclusion: This information aids in identifying surfers who are more at risk of acute and chronic injury. These findings reinforce the relevance of preventative surf specific conditioning (proprioceptive, strength and flexibility) exercises in at risk surfing sub-groups.Key practice points: Younger surfers were more at risk of suffering an acute injury (<35 years). Older surfers were more likely to suffer a chronic injury (>38 years). Acute injury was associated with increased hours surfing (>6.5 hours per week). Screening and surf specific conditioning exercises could be implemented for at risk sub-groups.Key practice points:  Younger surfers were more at risk of suffering an acute injury (<35 years). Older surfers were more likely to suffer a chronic injury (>38 years).  Acute injury was associated with increased hours surfing (>6.5 hours per week).  Screening and surf specific conditioning exercises could be implemented for at risk subgroups. 

AB - Questions: Are there age related differences in the incidence of acute injuries or the prevalence of chronic injuries for recreational and competitive surfers. Design: Retrospective observational study. Participants: A total of 1,348 participants completed an online survey consisting of three sections: demographics, acute and chronic injury. Results: Of 1,348 surfers (1,231 male, mean age 36.2 ±13.2, 117 female mean age 31.9 ±11.1), 708 (52.5%) suffered an acute injury whilst surfing in the preceding 12months. As expected those suffering an acute injury on average spent significantly (t=5.2, p<0.001) more time surfing (343.1 ±312.0 versus 263.1 ±259.9 hours/year) than those who were uninjured. Independent t tests revealed a significant difference (t=5.2, p<0.001) between age and incidence of acute injury with younger surfers (34.1 ±12.3 versus 37.8 ±13.6 years) more likely to sustain an acute injury in the previous twelve months. Of the 1,348 surfers, 477 (35.4%) suffered from a chronic injury caused or aggravated by surfing. Older surfers (39.3 ±12.0 vs. 33.9 ±13.3 years) were more likely to sustain a chronic injury (t=7.6, p<0.001) whilst surfing. Of interest there was no significant difference (t=0.38, p=0.11) between prevalence of chronic injury and hours spent surfing (309.6 ±272.0 versus 303.2 ±301.3 hours/year). Conclusion: This information aids in identifying surfers who are more at risk of acute and chronic injury. These findings reinforce the relevance of preventative surf specific conditioning (proprioceptive, strength and flexibility) exercises in at risk surfing sub-groups.Key practice points: Younger surfers were more at risk of suffering an acute injury (<35 years). Older surfers were more likely to suffer a chronic injury (>38 years). Acute injury was associated with increased hours surfing (>6.5 hours per week). Screening and surf specific conditioning exercises could be implemented for at risk sub-groups.Key practice points:  Younger surfers were more at risk of suffering an acute injury (<35 years). Older surfers were more likely to suffer a chronic injury (>38 years).  Acute injury was associated with increased hours surfing (>6.5 hours per week).  Screening and surf specific conditioning exercises could be implemented for at risk subgroups. 

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Furness J, Hing WA, Walsh J, Sheppard JM, Climstein M. Risk factors for acute and chronic injury in recreational and competitive surfers. 2013. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne, Australia.