Risk activities and pre-travel health seeking practices of notified cases of imported infectious diseases in Australia

Prakash Paudel, C. Raina, Nicholas Zwar, Holly Seale, Heather Worth, Mohamud Sheikh, Anita E. Heywood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Travellers are at risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel, with risks differing by destination, travel and traveller characteristics. A pre-travel health consultation may minimize this risk. However, uptake of pre-travel health advice remains low. We investigated pre-travel health preparations and disease-specific risk behaviours among notified cases of selected travel-associated infectious diseases imported into Australia.

Methods: Prospective enhanced surveillance of notified cases of typhoid, paratyphoid, measles, hepatitis A, hepatitis E, malaria and chikungunya was conducted in two Australian states between February 2013 and January 2014. Details of pre-travel health preparation and disease-specific risk behaviours were collected.

Results: Among 180 cases associated with international travel, 28% were <18 years, 65% were VFR travellers and 22% were frequent travellers, having travelled ≥5 times in the past 5 years. 25% had sought pre-travel advice from a healthcare provider, and 16% reported a pre-travel vaccine. Seeking pre-travel health advice did not differ by immigrant status ( P  = 0.22) or by reason for travel ( P  = 0.13) but was more commonly sought by first time travellers ( P  = 0.03). Travellers visiting friends and relatives were more likely to report at-risk activities of brushing teeth with tap water ( P  < 0.001) and eating uncooked food ( P  = 0.03) during travel compared to other travellers.

Conclusions: Pre-travel health advice seeking practices and vaccine uptake was suboptimal among cases of notified disease. The results of this study highlight the need for a better understanding of barriers to pre-travel health seeking, particularly among high risk travellers, to reduce the importation of infectious diseases into Australia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Travel Medicine
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Communicable Diseases
Health
Risk-Taking
Vaccines
Hepatitis E
Hepatitis A
Typhoid Fever
Measles
Health Personnel
Malaria
Tooth
Referral and Consultation
Eating

Cite this

Paudel, Prakash ; Raina, C. ; Zwar, Nicholas ; Seale, Holly ; Worth, Heather ; Sheikh, Mohamud ; Heywood, Anita E. / Risk activities and pre-travel health seeking practices of notified cases of imported infectious diseases in Australia. In: Journal of Travel Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 5.
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abstract = "Background: Travellers are at risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel, with risks differing by destination, travel and traveller characteristics. A pre-travel health consultation may minimize this risk. However, uptake of pre-travel health advice remains low. We investigated pre-travel health preparations and disease-specific risk behaviours among notified cases of selected travel-associated infectious diseases imported into Australia.Methods: Prospective enhanced surveillance of notified cases of typhoid, paratyphoid, measles, hepatitis A, hepatitis E, malaria and chikungunya was conducted in two Australian states between February 2013 and January 2014. Details of pre-travel health preparation and disease-specific risk behaviours were collected.Results: Among 180 cases associated with international travel, 28{\%} were <18 years, 65{\%} were VFR travellers and 22{\%} were frequent travellers, having travelled ≥5 times in the past 5 years. 25{\%} had sought pre-travel advice from a healthcare provider, and 16{\%} reported a pre-travel vaccine. Seeking pre-travel health advice did not differ by immigrant status ( P  = 0.22) or by reason for travel ( P  = 0.13) but was more commonly sought by first time travellers ( P  = 0.03). Travellers visiting friends and relatives were more likely to report at-risk activities of brushing teeth with tap water ( P  < 0.001) and eating uncooked food ( P  = 0.03) during travel compared to other travellers.Conclusions: Pre-travel health advice seeking practices and vaccine uptake was suboptimal among cases of notified disease. The results of this study highlight the need for a better understanding of barriers to pre-travel health seeking, particularly among high risk travellers, to reduce the importation of infectious diseases into Australia.",
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Risk activities and pre-travel health seeking practices of notified cases of imported infectious diseases in Australia. / Paudel, Prakash; Raina, C.; Zwar, Nicholas; Seale, Holly; Worth, Heather; Sheikh, Mohamud; Heywood, Anita E.

In: Journal of Travel Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk activities and pre-travel health seeking practices of notified cases of imported infectious diseases in Australia

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AU - Raina, C.

AU - Zwar, Nicholas

AU - Seale, Holly

AU - Worth, Heather

AU - Sheikh, Mohamud

AU - Heywood, Anita E.

PY - 2017/9/1

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N2 - Background: Travellers are at risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel, with risks differing by destination, travel and traveller characteristics. A pre-travel health consultation may minimize this risk. However, uptake of pre-travel health advice remains low. We investigated pre-travel health preparations and disease-specific risk behaviours among notified cases of selected travel-associated infectious diseases imported into Australia.Methods: Prospective enhanced surveillance of notified cases of typhoid, paratyphoid, measles, hepatitis A, hepatitis E, malaria and chikungunya was conducted in two Australian states between February 2013 and January 2014. Details of pre-travel health preparation and disease-specific risk behaviours were collected.Results: Among 180 cases associated with international travel, 28% were <18 years, 65% were VFR travellers and 22% were frequent travellers, having travelled ≥5 times in the past 5 years. 25% had sought pre-travel advice from a healthcare provider, and 16% reported a pre-travel vaccine. Seeking pre-travel health advice did not differ by immigrant status ( P  = 0.22) or by reason for travel ( P  = 0.13) but was more commonly sought by first time travellers ( P  = 0.03). Travellers visiting friends and relatives were more likely to report at-risk activities of brushing teeth with tap water ( P  < 0.001) and eating uncooked food ( P  = 0.03) during travel compared to other travellers.Conclusions: Pre-travel health advice seeking practices and vaccine uptake was suboptimal among cases of notified disease. The results of this study highlight the need for a better understanding of barriers to pre-travel health seeking, particularly among high risk travellers, to reduce the importation of infectious diseases into Australia.

AB - Background: Travellers are at risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel, with risks differing by destination, travel and traveller characteristics. A pre-travel health consultation may minimize this risk. However, uptake of pre-travel health advice remains low. We investigated pre-travel health preparations and disease-specific risk behaviours among notified cases of selected travel-associated infectious diseases imported into Australia.Methods: Prospective enhanced surveillance of notified cases of typhoid, paratyphoid, measles, hepatitis A, hepatitis E, malaria and chikungunya was conducted in two Australian states between February 2013 and January 2014. Details of pre-travel health preparation and disease-specific risk behaviours were collected.Results: Among 180 cases associated with international travel, 28% were <18 years, 65% were VFR travellers and 22% were frequent travellers, having travelled ≥5 times in the past 5 years. 25% had sought pre-travel advice from a healthcare provider, and 16% reported a pre-travel vaccine. Seeking pre-travel health advice did not differ by immigrant status ( P  = 0.22) or by reason for travel ( P  = 0.13) but was more commonly sought by first time travellers ( P  = 0.03). Travellers visiting friends and relatives were more likely to report at-risk activities of brushing teeth with tap water ( P  < 0.001) and eating uncooked food ( P  = 0.03) during travel compared to other travellers.Conclusions: Pre-travel health advice seeking practices and vaccine uptake was suboptimal among cases of notified disease. The results of this study highlight the need for a better understanding of barriers to pre-travel health seeking, particularly among high risk travellers, to reduce the importation of infectious diseases into Australia.

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U2 - 10.1093/jtm/tax044

DO - 10.1093/jtm/tax044

M3 - Article

VL - 24

JO - Journal of Travel Medicine

JF - Journal of Travel Medicine

SN - 1195-1982

IS - 5

ER -