Retrospective injury epidemiology of one hundred one competitive oceania power lifters: The effects of age, body mass, competitive standard, and gender

Justin Keogh, Patria A. Hume, Simon Pearson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The injury epidemiology of competitive power lifters was investigated to provide a basis for injury prevention initiatives in power lifting. Self-reported retrospective injury data for 1 year and selected biographical and training information were obtained via a 4-page injury survey from 82 men and 19 women of varying ages (Open and Masters), body masses (lightweight and heavyweight), and competitive standards (national and international). Injury was defined as any physical damage to the body that caused the lifter to miss or modify one or more training sessions or miss a competition. A total of 118 injuries, which equated to 1.2 ± 1.1 injuries per lifter per year and 4.4 ± 4.8 injuries per 1,000 hours of training, were reported. The most commonly injured body regions were the shoulder (36%), lower back (24%), elbow (11%), and knee (9%). More injuries appeared to be of a sudden (acute) (59%) rather than gradual (chronic) nature (41%). National competitors had a significantly greater rate of injury (5.8 ± 4.9 per 1,000 hours) than international competitors (3.6 ± 3.6 per 1,000 hours). The relative proportion of injuries at some body regions varied significantly as a function of competitive standard and gender. No significant differences in injury profile were seen between Open and Masters or between lightweight and heavyweight lifters. Power lifting appears to have a moderately low risk of injury, regardless of the lifter's age, body mass, competitive standard, or gender, compared with other sports. Future research should utilize a prospective cohort or case-controlled design to examine the effect of a range of other intrinsic and extrinsic factors on injury epidemiology and to assess the effects of various intervention strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)672-681
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oceania
Epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries
Body Regions
Intrinsic Factor

Cite this

@article{a421296a784f4f78a7ad6403c81bbd84,
title = "Retrospective injury epidemiology of one hundred one competitive oceania power lifters: The effects of age, body mass, competitive standard, and gender",
abstract = "The injury epidemiology of competitive power lifters was investigated to provide a basis for injury prevention initiatives in power lifting. Self-reported retrospective injury data for 1 year and selected biographical and training information were obtained via a 4-page injury survey from 82 men and 19 women of varying ages (Open and Masters), body masses (lightweight and heavyweight), and competitive standards (national and international). Injury was defined as any physical damage to the body that caused the lifter to miss or modify one or more training sessions or miss a competition. A total of 118 injuries, which equated to 1.2 ± 1.1 injuries per lifter per year and 4.4 ± 4.8 injuries per 1,000 hours of training, were reported. The most commonly injured body regions were the shoulder (36{\%}), lower back (24{\%}), elbow (11{\%}), and knee (9{\%}). More injuries appeared to be of a sudden (acute) (59{\%}) rather than gradual (chronic) nature (41{\%}). National competitors had a significantly greater rate of injury (5.8 ± 4.9 per 1,000 hours) than international competitors (3.6 ± 3.6 per 1,000 hours). The relative proportion of injuries at some body regions varied significantly as a function of competitive standard and gender. No significant differences in injury profile were seen between Open and Masters or between lightweight and heavyweight lifters. Power lifting appears to have a moderately low risk of injury, regardless of the lifter's age, body mass, competitive standard, or gender, compared with other sports. Future research should utilize a prospective cohort or case-controlled design to examine the effect of a range of other intrinsic and extrinsic factors on injury epidemiology and to assess the effects of various intervention strategies.",
author = "Justin Keogh and Hume, {Patria A.} and Simon Pearson",
year = "2006",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1519/R-18325.1",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "672--681",
journal = "Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research",
issn = "1064-8011",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

Retrospective injury epidemiology of one hundred one competitive oceania power lifters : The effects of age, body mass, competitive standard, and gender. / Keogh, Justin; Hume, Patria A.; Pearson, Simon.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 20, No. 3, 08.2006, p. 672-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Retrospective injury epidemiology of one hundred one competitive oceania power lifters

T2 - The effects of age, body mass, competitive standard, and gender

AU - Keogh, Justin

AU - Hume, Patria A.

AU - Pearson, Simon

PY - 2006/8

Y1 - 2006/8

N2 - The injury epidemiology of competitive power lifters was investigated to provide a basis for injury prevention initiatives in power lifting. Self-reported retrospective injury data for 1 year and selected biographical and training information were obtained via a 4-page injury survey from 82 men and 19 women of varying ages (Open and Masters), body masses (lightweight and heavyweight), and competitive standards (national and international). Injury was defined as any physical damage to the body that caused the lifter to miss or modify one or more training sessions or miss a competition. A total of 118 injuries, which equated to 1.2 ± 1.1 injuries per lifter per year and 4.4 ± 4.8 injuries per 1,000 hours of training, were reported. The most commonly injured body regions were the shoulder (36%), lower back (24%), elbow (11%), and knee (9%). More injuries appeared to be of a sudden (acute) (59%) rather than gradual (chronic) nature (41%). National competitors had a significantly greater rate of injury (5.8 ± 4.9 per 1,000 hours) than international competitors (3.6 ± 3.6 per 1,000 hours). The relative proportion of injuries at some body regions varied significantly as a function of competitive standard and gender. No significant differences in injury profile were seen between Open and Masters or between lightweight and heavyweight lifters. Power lifting appears to have a moderately low risk of injury, regardless of the lifter's age, body mass, competitive standard, or gender, compared with other sports. Future research should utilize a prospective cohort or case-controlled design to examine the effect of a range of other intrinsic and extrinsic factors on injury epidemiology and to assess the effects of various intervention strategies.

AB - The injury epidemiology of competitive power lifters was investigated to provide a basis for injury prevention initiatives in power lifting. Self-reported retrospective injury data for 1 year and selected biographical and training information were obtained via a 4-page injury survey from 82 men and 19 women of varying ages (Open and Masters), body masses (lightweight and heavyweight), and competitive standards (national and international). Injury was defined as any physical damage to the body that caused the lifter to miss or modify one or more training sessions or miss a competition. A total of 118 injuries, which equated to 1.2 ± 1.1 injuries per lifter per year and 4.4 ± 4.8 injuries per 1,000 hours of training, were reported. The most commonly injured body regions were the shoulder (36%), lower back (24%), elbow (11%), and knee (9%). More injuries appeared to be of a sudden (acute) (59%) rather than gradual (chronic) nature (41%). National competitors had a significantly greater rate of injury (5.8 ± 4.9 per 1,000 hours) than international competitors (3.6 ± 3.6 per 1,000 hours). The relative proportion of injuries at some body regions varied significantly as a function of competitive standard and gender. No significant differences in injury profile were seen between Open and Masters or between lightweight and heavyweight lifters. Power lifting appears to have a moderately low risk of injury, regardless of the lifter's age, body mass, competitive standard, or gender, compared with other sports. Future research should utilize a prospective cohort or case-controlled design to examine the effect of a range of other intrinsic and extrinsic factors on injury epidemiology and to assess the effects of various intervention strategies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33749003753&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1519/R-18325.1

DO - 10.1519/R-18325.1

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 672

EP - 681

JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

IS - 3

ER -