Research methods in forensic psychology

Katarina Fritzon, Mark Kebbell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Students wishing to undertake research on a forensic-relevant topic often have no difficulty coming up with interesting, novel and worthwhile research ideas; however, these ideas often are beyond the scope of what would be considered 'do-able' for a fourth year, or even Masters level, thesis. Often, the research topics that forensic students are initially interested in would take years to design, implement and analyse, or would never get past a university ethics committee! Some examples of the latter include studying psychopathic characteristics in children and the influence of memory-enhancing techniques on rape-victims' experience of trauma; examples of the former include the big question: Why do people commit crimes?
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationForensic psychology and criminology
Subtitle of host publicationAn Australian perspective
EditorsK. Fritzon, P. Wilson
Place of PublicationNorth Ryde
PublisherMcGraw-Hill Companies
Pages165-172
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9780070134928
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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    Fritzon, K., & Kebbell, M. (2008). Research methods in forensic psychology. In K. Fritzon, & P. Wilson (Eds.), Forensic psychology and criminology: An Australian perspective (pp. 165-172). McGraw-Hill Companies.