Renaming low risk conditions labelled as cancer

Brooke Nickel, Ray Moynihan, Alexandra Barratt, Juan P. Brito, Kirsten McCaffery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

[Extract] Removing the cancer label in low risk conditions that are unlikely to cause harm if left untreated may help reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment, argue Brooke Nickel and colleagues

Evidence is mounting that disease labels affect people’s psychological responses and their decisions about management options.1 The use of more medicalised labels can increase both concern about illness and desire for more invasive treatment. For low risk lesions where there is evidence of overdiagnosis and previous calls to replace the term cancer, we consider the potential implications of removing the cancer label and how this may be achieved.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberk3322
Number of pages8
JournalBMJ (Online)
Volume362
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2018

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Neoplasms
Nickel
Psychology
Medical Overuse

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Nickel, B., Moynihan, R., Barratt, A., Brito, J. P., & McCaffery, K. (2018). Renaming low risk conditions labelled as cancer. BMJ (Online), 362, [k3322]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k3322
Nickel, Brooke ; Moynihan, Ray ; Barratt, Alexandra ; Brito, Juan P. ; McCaffery, Kirsten. / Renaming low risk conditions labelled as cancer. In: BMJ (Online). 2018 ; Vol. 362.
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Nickel, B, Moynihan, R, Barratt, A, Brito, JP & McCaffery, K 2018, 'Renaming low risk conditions labelled as cancer' BMJ (Online), vol. 362, k3322. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k3322

Renaming low risk conditions labelled as cancer. / Nickel, Brooke; Moynihan, Ray; Barratt, Alexandra; Brito, Juan P.; McCaffery, Kirsten.

In: BMJ (Online), Vol. 362, k3322, 12.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Nickel B, Moynihan R, Barratt A, Brito JP, McCaffery K. Renaming low risk conditions labelled as cancer. BMJ (Online). 2018 Aug 12;362. k3322. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k3322