Religious Orientations and Consumer Ethics: The Mediating Role of Personal Moral Philosophies

Rafi M.M.I. Chowdhury*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the roles of intrinsic religiosity, quest religiosity and personal moral philosophies (idealism and relativism) as predictors of consumers’ ethical beliefs. An online survey was conducted with 500 US consumers to identify these relationships. The results indicate that intrinsic religiosity and quest religiosity lead to negative beliefs regarding unethical consumer actions (actively benefiting from illegal actions, passively benefiting from the mistakes of the seller and actively benefiting from legal but questionable actions) and positive beliefs regarding pro-social actions mediated through idealism. Quest religiosity also leads to positive beliefs regarding unethical consumer actions (passively benefiting from the mistakes of the seller) mediated through relativism. Supplementing these indirect effects, intrinsic religiosity and quest religiosity have direct influences on some, but not all, dimensions of consumer ethics. Considering the mediating roles of idealism and relativism in relation to the effects of religiosity on consumer ethics, policies and practices that enhance idealism and reduce relativism should be supported to encourage ethical consumption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-330
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Macromarketing
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

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