Reliability and clinical utility of the Pliance X for measuring pressure at the interface of pressure garments and burn scars in children

Jodie Wiseman*, Megan Simons, Roy Kimble, Zephanie Tyack

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Reliable, clinically acceptable pressure measuring devices are important to accurately record interface pressure. The Pliance X is a device that may overcome previous device limitations (i.e. pressure garment distortion, temperature dependent sensors). This research aimed to identify the test–retest reliability and clinical utility of the Pliance X in children receiving pressure garment therapy post-burn. 

Methods: Data was collected as part of a pilot longitudinal cohort study. Immediate test–retest reliability was investigated at baseline and analysed using Intra-Class Correlation Coefficients (ICCs). Clinical utility was evaluated at baseline using the criteria of appropriate, accessible, practicable and acceptable. 

Results: Thirty-one children completed baseline measurements. Participants had a median age of three years (IQR: 1.5, 7.5), and 61% were male. Test–retest reliability of the Pliance X was close to acceptable for clinical use for stationary interface pressure (ICC = 0.87, n = 27). The Pliance X was appropriate and acceptable for children of all ages who were not distressed. 

Discussion: Further reliability testing is required, including inter-rater reliability testing. The device's clinical utility could be improved with alternate sensor styles and an instant mean pressure reading to enable immediately clinically useful information on the interface pressure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1820-1828
Number of pages9
JournalBurns
Volume44
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018
Externally publishedYes

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