Relative and absolute reliability of functional performance measures for adults with dementia living in residential aged care

Benjamin Fox, Timothy Henwood, Christine Neville, Justin Keogh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This pilot investigation aimed to assess the relative and absolute test-retest reliability of commonly used functional performance measures in older adults with dementia residing in residential aged care facilities.

METHODS: A total of 12 participants were tested on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), the Balance Outcome Measure for Elder Rehab (BOOMER), hand grip strength, anthropometric measures and Bio-electric Impedance Analysis (BIA). This study utilized a seven-day test-retest evaluation. Intra-class Correlation Coefficients (ICC) were used to assess relative reliability, Typical Error of Measurement (TEM) was used to assess the absolute reliability, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess group and individual levels of agreement.

RESULTS: With the exception of Standing Balance (ICC = 0.49), 2.4-m walk (ICC = 0.68), functional reach (ICC = 0.38), and static timed standing (ICC = 0.47), all measures demonstrated acceptable (>0.71) ICCs. However, only the anthropometric measures demonstrated acceptable levels of absolute reliability (>10% TEM). Bland-Altman analysis showed non-significant (p > 0.05) mean differences, and eight out of the 17 measures showing wide Limits of Agreement (LoA).

CONCLUSIONS: Current measures of functional performance are demonstrably inappropriate for use with a population of older adults with dementia. Authors suggest aligning current measurement strategies with Item Response Theory as a way forward.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1659-67
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Hand Strength
Dementia
Electric Impedance
Reproducibility of Results
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: This pilot investigation aimed to assess the relative and absolute test-retest reliability of commonly used functional performance measures in older adults with dementia residing in residential aged care facilities.METHODS: A total of 12 participants were tested on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), the Balance Outcome Measure for Elder Rehab (BOOMER), hand grip strength, anthropometric measures and Bio-electric Impedance Analysis (BIA). This study utilized a seven-day test-retest evaluation. Intra-class Correlation Coefficients (ICC) were used to assess relative reliability, Typical Error of Measurement (TEM) was used to assess the absolute reliability, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess group and individual levels of agreement.RESULTS: With the exception of Standing Balance (ICC = 0.49), 2.4-m walk (ICC = 0.68), functional reach (ICC = 0.38), and static timed standing (ICC = 0.47), all measures demonstrated acceptable (>0.71) ICCs. However, only the anthropometric measures demonstrated acceptable levels of absolute reliability (>10{\%} TEM). Bland-Altman analysis showed non-significant (p > 0.05) mean differences, and eight out of the 17 measures showing wide Limits of Agreement (LoA).CONCLUSIONS: Current measures of functional performance are demonstrably inappropriate for use with a population of older adults with dementia. Authors suggest aligning current measurement strategies with Item Response Theory as a way forward.",
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Relative and absolute reliability of functional performance measures for adults with dementia living in residential aged care. / Fox, Benjamin; Henwood, Timothy; Neville, Christine; Keogh, Justin.

In: International Psychogeriatrics, Vol. 26, No. 10, 2014, p. 1659-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - BACKGROUND: This pilot investigation aimed to assess the relative and absolute test-retest reliability of commonly used functional performance measures in older adults with dementia residing in residential aged care facilities.METHODS: A total of 12 participants were tested on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), the Balance Outcome Measure for Elder Rehab (BOOMER), hand grip strength, anthropometric measures and Bio-electric Impedance Analysis (BIA). This study utilized a seven-day test-retest evaluation. Intra-class Correlation Coefficients (ICC) were used to assess relative reliability, Typical Error of Measurement (TEM) was used to assess the absolute reliability, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess group and individual levels of agreement.RESULTS: With the exception of Standing Balance (ICC = 0.49), 2.4-m walk (ICC = 0.68), functional reach (ICC = 0.38), and static timed standing (ICC = 0.47), all measures demonstrated acceptable (>0.71) ICCs. However, only the anthropometric measures demonstrated acceptable levels of absolute reliability (>10% TEM). Bland-Altman analysis showed non-significant (p > 0.05) mean differences, and eight out of the 17 measures showing wide Limits of Agreement (LoA).CONCLUSIONS: Current measures of functional performance are demonstrably inappropriate for use with a population of older adults with dementia. Authors suggest aligning current measurement strategies with Item Response Theory as a way forward.

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