Relationships between the 1.5-mile Run and Multi-stage Fitness Test in Deputy Sheriff Recruits Post-Academy Training

Javier Hernandez, Matthew R. Moreno, Katherine Balfany, Joseph Dulla, Jay J. Dawes, Rob Marc Orr, Robert G. Lockie

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

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Abstract

The most popular method for measuring aerobic fitness within US law enforcement agencies (LEA) is the 1.5 mile run (1.5 MI run). A limitation of the 1.5 MI run is that it relies on the recruits’ internal pacing. In contrast, the 20m multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) is more popular globally in tests of LEA recruits and officers, and is externally paced which does not allow the individual to perform at a pace they are comfortable with. Academy training is used to prepare recruits for the rigors of duty and to enhance physical fitness. If training approaches are successful during academy, aerobic fitness as measured by the 1.5 MI run and the MSFT should be relatively similar, in that recruits should be aerobically fit and have the high-intensity running capacity to perform well in both tests. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between the 1.5 MI run and the MSFT of deputy sheriff recruits at the end of academy. Retrospective analysis on 5 academy classes from one LEA was conducted (227 males, 34 females). The 1.5 MI run and MSFT were conducted in the last few weeks of the recruits’ 22-week academy. Time was recorded for the 1.5 MI run while total shuttles were recorded for the MSFT; estimated maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) was calculated from both tests. Estimated VO2max from the aforementioned tests was compared with paired samples t-tests. Pearson’s correlations and linear regression scatter plots calculated relationships between the 1.5 MI run and MSFT. Each sex was analyzed separately, with p<0.05 set for all analyses. The VO2max calculated from the 1.5 MI run were significantly greater than those for the MSFT for both males (47.04 vs. 40.88 ml/kg/min), and females (43.16 vs. 37.02 ml/kg/min). The VO2max of the 1.5 MI run significantly correlated with the MSFT for males (r = -0.49) but not females (r = -0.31). The r2 values from the regression equations for males (0.24), and females (0.10) were both low. The results suggest that recruits performed relatively better in the 1.5 MI run compared to the MSFT. The physical training program tended to emphasize calisthenics, interval running circuits that lacked evidence-based work: rest ratios, and distance running; this could have impacted these results. Given the weak relationships between the tests, especially for females, this would suggest recruits still have limitations in high-intensity, externally paced running. Since the job demands of a deputy sheriff are externally paced by nature, this outcome is not ideal. Academy training programs should explore the use of evidence-based high-intensity running programs.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018
EventThe 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine - Costa Mesa Hilton, Costa Mesa, United States
Duration: 26 Oct 201827 Oct 2018
Conference number: 38th
https://www.acsm.org/acsm-membership/regional-chapters/acsm-chapters/southwest/southwest-l2

Conference

ConferenceThe 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine
Abbreviated titleSWACSM
CountryUnited States
CityCosta Mesa
Period26/10/1827/10/18
Internet address

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Hernandez, J., Moreno, M. R., Balfany, K., Dulla, J., Dawes, J. J., Orr, R. M., & Lockie, R. G. (2018). Relationships between the 1.5-mile Run and Multi-stage Fitness Test in Deputy Sheriff Recruits Post-Academy Training. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.
Hernandez, Javier ; Moreno, Matthew R. ; Balfany, Katherine ; Dulla, Joseph ; Dawes, Jay J. ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Lockie, Robert G. / Relationships between the 1.5-mile Run and Multi-stage Fitness Test in Deputy Sheriff Recruits Post-Academy Training. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.
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title = "Relationships between the 1.5-mile Run and Multi-stage Fitness Test in Deputy Sheriff Recruits Post-Academy Training",
abstract = "The most popular method for measuring aerobic fitness within US law enforcement agencies (LEA) is the 1.5 mile run (1.5 MI run). A limitation of the 1.5 MI run is that it relies on the recruits’ internal pacing. In contrast, the 20m multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) is more popular globally in tests of LEA recruits and officers, and is externally paced which does not allow the individual to perform at a pace they are comfortable with. Academy training is used to prepare recruits for the rigors of duty and to enhance physical fitness. If training approaches are successful during academy, aerobic fitness as measured by the 1.5 MI run and the MSFT should be relatively similar, in that recruits should be aerobically fit and have the high-intensity running capacity to perform well in both tests. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between the 1.5 MI run and the MSFT of deputy sheriff recruits at the end of academy. Retrospective analysis on 5 academy classes from one LEA was conducted (227 males, 34 females). The 1.5 MI run and MSFT were conducted in the last few weeks of the recruits’ 22-week academy. Time was recorded for the 1.5 MI run while total shuttles were recorded for the MSFT; estimated maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) was calculated from both tests. Estimated VO2max from the aforementioned tests was compared with paired samples t-tests. Pearson’s correlations and linear regression scatter plots calculated relationships between the 1.5 MI run and MSFT. Each sex was analyzed separately, with p<0.05 set for all analyses. The VO2max calculated from the 1.5 MI run were significantly greater than those for the MSFT for both males (47.04 vs. 40.88 ml/kg/min), and females (43.16 vs. 37.02 ml/kg/min). The VO2max of the 1.5 MI run significantly correlated with the MSFT for males (r = -0.49) but not females (r = -0.31). The r2 values from the regression equations for males (0.24), and females (0.10) were both low. The results suggest that recruits performed relatively better in the 1.5 MI run compared to the MSFT. The physical training program tended to emphasize calisthenics, interval running circuits that lacked evidence-based work: rest ratios, and distance running; this could have impacted these results. Given the weak relationships between the tests, especially for females, this would suggest recruits still have limitations in high-intensity, externally paced running. Since the job demands of a deputy sheriff are externally paced by nature, this outcome is not ideal. Academy training programs should explore the use of evidence-based high-intensity running programs.",
author = "Javier Hernandez and Moreno, {Matthew R.} and Katherine Balfany and Joseph Dulla and Dawes, {Jay J.} and Orr, {Rob Marc} and Lockie, {Robert G.}",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
language = "English",
note = "The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, SWACSM ; Conference date: 26-10-2018 Through 27-10-2018",
url = "https://www.acsm.org/acsm-membership/regional-chapters/acsm-chapters/southwest/southwest-l2",

}

Hernandez, J, Moreno, MR, Balfany, K, Dulla, J, Dawes, JJ, Orr, RM & Lockie, RG 2018, 'Relationships between the 1.5-mile Run and Multi-stage Fitness Test in Deputy Sheriff Recruits Post-Academy Training' The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States, 26/10/18 - 27/10/18, .

Relationships between the 1.5-mile Run and Multi-stage Fitness Test in Deputy Sheriff Recruits Post-Academy Training. / Hernandez, Javier; Moreno, Matthew R. ; Balfany, Katherine ; Dulla, Joseph; Dawes, Jay J.; Orr, Rob Marc; Lockie, Robert G.

2018. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - Relationships between the 1.5-mile Run and Multi-stage Fitness Test in Deputy Sheriff Recruits Post-Academy Training

AU - Hernandez, Javier

AU - Moreno, Matthew R.

AU - Balfany, Katherine

AU - Dulla, Joseph

AU - Dawes, Jay J.

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - The most popular method for measuring aerobic fitness within US law enforcement agencies (LEA) is the 1.5 mile run (1.5 MI run). A limitation of the 1.5 MI run is that it relies on the recruits’ internal pacing. In contrast, the 20m multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) is more popular globally in tests of LEA recruits and officers, and is externally paced which does not allow the individual to perform at a pace they are comfortable with. Academy training is used to prepare recruits for the rigors of duty and to enhance physical fitness. If training approaches are successful during academy, aerobic fitness as measured by the 1.5 MI run and the MSFT should be relatively similar, in that recruits should be aerobically fit and have the high-intensity running capacity to perform well in both tests. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between the 1.5 MI run and the MSFT of deputy sheriff recruits at the end of academy. Retrospective analysis on 5 academy classes from one LEA was conducted (227 males, 34 females). The 1.5 MI run and MSFT were conducted in the last few weeks of the recruits’ 22-week academy. Time was recorded for the 1.5 MI run while total shuttles were recorded for the MSFT; estimated maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) was calculated from both tests. Estimated VO2max from the aforementioned tests was compared with paired samples t-tests. Pearson’s correlations and linear regression scatter plots calculated relationships between the 1.5 MI run and MSFT. Each sex was analyzed separately, with p<0.05 set for all analyses. The VO2max calculated from the 1.5 MI run were significantly greater than those for the MSFT for both males (47.04 vs. 40.88 ml/kg/min), and females (43.16 vs. 37.02 ml/kg/min). The VO2max of the 1.5 MI run significantly correlated with the MSFT for males (r = -0.49) but not females (r = -0.31). The r2 values from the regression equations for males (0.24), and females (0.10) were both low. The results suggest that recruits performed relatively better in the 1.5 MI run compared to the MSFT. The physical training program tended to emphasize calisthenics, interval running circuits that lacked evidence-based work: rest ratios, and distance running; this could have impacted these results. Given the weak relationships between the tests, especially for females, this would suggest recruits still have limitations in high-intensity, externally paced running. Since the job demands of a deputy sheriff are externally paced by nature, this outcome is not ideal. Academy training programs should explore the use of evidence-based high-intensity running programs.

AB - The most popular method for measuring aerobic fitness within US law enforcement agencies (LEA) is the 1.5 mile run (1.5 MI run). A limitation of the 1.5 MI run is that it relies on the recruits’ internal pacing. In contrast, the 20m multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) is more popular globally in tests of LEA recruits and officers, and is externally paced which does not allow the individual to perform at a pace they are comfortable with. Academy training is used to prepare recruits for the rigors of duty and to enhance physical fitness. If training approaches are successful during academy, aerobic fitness as measured by the 1.5 MI run and the MSFT should be relatively similar, in that recruits should be aerobically fit and have the high-intensity running capacity to perform well in both tests. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between the 1.5 MI run and the MSFT of deputy sheriff recruits at the end of academy. Retrospective analysis on 5 academy classes from one LEA was conducted (227 males, 34 females). The 1.5 MI run and MSFT were conducted in the last few weeks of the recruits’ 22-week academy. Time was recorded for the 1.5 MI run while total shuttles were recorded for the MSFT; estimated maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) was calculated from both tests. Estimated VO2max from the aforementioned tests was compared with paired samples t-tests. Pearson’s correlations and linear regression scatter plots calculated relationships between the 1.5 MI run and MSFT. Each sex was analyzed separately, with p<0.05 set for all analyses. The VO2max calculated from the 1.5 MI run were significantly greater than those for the MSFT for both males (47.04 vs. 40.88 ml/kg/min), and females (43.16 vs. 37.02 ml/kg/min). The VO2max of the 1.5 MI run significantly correlated with the MSFT for males (r = -0.49) but not females (r = -0.31). The r2 values from the regression equations for males (0.24), and females (0.10) were both low. The results suggest that recruits performed relatively better in the 1.5 MI run compared to the MSFT. The physical training program tended to emphasize calisthenics, interval running circuits that lacked evidence-based work: rest ratios, and distance running; this could have impacted these results. Given the weak relationships between the tests, especially for females, this would suggest recruits still have limitations in high-intensity, externally paced running. Since the job demands of a deputy sheriff are externally paced by nature, this outcome is not ideal. Academy training programs should explore the use of evidence-based high-intensity running programs.

UR - https://www.acsm.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/swacsm-2018-program684bdc1fc67b43fe9b81c68223661da0.pdf?sfvrsn=a95abbd4_0

M3 - Poster

ER -

Hernandez J, Moreno MR, Balfany K, Dulla J, Dawes JJ, Orr RM et al. Relationships between the 1.5-mile Run and Multi-stage Fitness Test in Deputy Sheriff Recruits Post-Academy Training. 2018. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.