Recreational impacts on the fauna of Australian coastal marine ecosystems

Nigel Hardiman, Shelley Burgin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reviews recent research into the ecological impacts of recreation and tourism on coastal marine fauna in Australia. Despite the high and growing importance of water-based recreation to the Australian economy, and the known fragility of many Australian ecosystems, there has been relatively limited research into the effects of marine tourism and recreation, infrastructure and activities, on aquatic resources. In this paper we have reviewed the ecological impacts on fauna that are caused by outdoor recreation (including tourism) in Australian coastal marine ecosystems. We predict that the single most potentially severe impact of recreation may be the introduction and/or dispersal of non-indigenous species of marine organisms by recreational vessels. Such introductions, together with other impacts due to human activities have the potential to increasingly degrade recreation destinations. In response, governments have introduced a wide range of legislative tools (e.g., impact assessment, protected area reservation) to manage the recreational industry. It would appear, however, that these instruments are not always appropriately applied.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2096-2108
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume91
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Aquatic ecosystems
marine ecosystem
fauna
Ecosystems
tourism
ecological impact
outdoor recreation
Water
Industry
protected area
vessel
human activity
infrastructure
recreation
ecosystem
industry
resource
water

Cite this

Hardiman, Nigel ; Burgin, Shelley. / Recreational impacts on the fauna of Australian coastal marine ecosystems. In: Journal of Environmental Management. 2010 ; Vol. 91, No. 11. pp. 2096-2108.
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Recreational impacts on the fauna of Australian coastal marine ecosystems. / Hardiman, Nigel; Burgin, Shelley.

In: Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 91, No. 11, 11.2010, p. 2096-2108.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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