Ready, Set, Break: Combat Training Injuries in Australian Army Personnel

Rob Marc Orr, Rodney R Pope

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this research was to investigate combat training-related injuries in Australian Army personnel.
Design: Retrospective cohort study.
Methods: Injury records covering a 2-year period were extracted from a military injury reporting database. Inclusion criteria were: a) records related to personnel serving in either the Army Reserve (ARES) or Australian Regular Army (ARA) who suffered a musculoskeletal injury (minor, serious or fatal) in the period of interest; and b) the identified injury cause met specific inclusion criteria related to combat training (e.g. battle PT, obstacle course, etc). Reported injury incidence rates were calculated for ARES and ARA and compared, and injury details were descriptively analysed. The Australian Defence (LERP 14-024) and Bond University (RO1927) Human Research Ethics Committees approved the study.
Results: In total, 4004 injury records met the inclusion criteria. The overall incidence rate for reported injuries was 6.3 injuries/100 person-years of service (full-time soldier rate = 5.6 inj/100 person-years of service: reserve soldier = 15.1 injuries/100 person-years of service). The leading combat training-related activities to cause injuries were ‘Combat Training’ (44.06%), ‘Physical Training’ (17.68%) and ‘Marching’ (15.61%). The ‘knee’ was the leading site of injury (14.43%), followed by the ‘ankle’ (11.14%) and ‘lower back’ (10.09%). The leading nature of injury was ‘Soft tissue injuries due to trauma or unknown mechanisms’ (46.70%) followed by ‘trauma to muscles’ (6.67%) and ‘heat stress/heat stroke’ (4.90%).
Conclusion / Key Practice Points: Combat specific training must be an integral part of any soldier’s return-to-work reconditioning program, especially for reserve personnel.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 17 Oct 2017
EventAPA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017 - Cockle Bay Wharf, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 19 Oct 201721 Oct 2017

Conference

ConferenceAPA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period19/10/1721/10/17
OtherAustralian Physiotherapy Association (APA) Momentum 2017 is organized by Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) and would be held during Oct 19 - 21, 2017 at Cockle Bay Wharf, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The target audience for this medical meeting basically for Physicians.

Physiotherapists have always been innovators in health, pushing forward to deliver excellent patient outcomes.

As the healthcare landscape becomes more competitive, it is important to keep moving with the changes. MOMENTUM 2017, the APA national conference will empower you to be part of the future of Australian and global physiotherapy.

Join with the rest of the profession to hear from leaders in physiotherapy about the latest clinical research. Meet the people you need to know to help you grow in your profession and discover the newest innovations.

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Military Personnel
Wounds and Injuries
Heat Stroke
Soft Tissue Injuries
Return to Work
Research Ethics Committees
Incidence
Ankle

Cite this

Orr, R. M., & Pope, R. R. (2017). Ready, Set, Break: Combat Training Injuries in Australian Army Personnel. APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.
Orr, Rob Marc ; Pope, Rodney R. / Ready, Set, Break: Combat Training Injuries in Australian Army Personnel. APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.
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title = "Ready, Set, Break: Combat Training Injuries in Australian Army Personnel",
abstract = "Aim: The aim of this research was to investigate combat training-related injuries in Australian Army personnel.Design: Retrospective cohort study.Methods: Injury records covering a 2-year period were extracted from a military injury reporting database. Inclusion criteria were: a) records related to personnel serving in either the Army Reserve (ARES) or Australian Regular Army (ARA) who suffered a musculoskeletal injury (minor, serious or fatal) in the period of interest; and b) the identified injury cause met specific inclusion criteria related to combat training (e.g. battle PT, obstacle course, etc). Reported injury incidence rates were calculated for ARES and ARA and compared, and injury details were descriptively analysed. The Australian Defence (LERP 14-024) and Bond University (RO1927) Human Research Ethics Committees approved the study. Results: In total, 4004 injury records met the inclusion criteria. The overall incidence rate for reported injuries was 6.3 injuries/100 person-years of service (full-time soldier rate = 5.6 inj/100 person-years of service: reserve soldier = 15.1 injuries/100 person-years of service). The leading combat training-related activities to cause injuries were ‘Combat Training’ (44.06{\%}), ‘Physical Training’ (17.68{\%}) and ‘Marching’ (15.61{\%}). The ‘knee’ was the leading site of injury (14.43{\%}), followed by the ‘ankle’ (11.14{\%}) and ‘lower back’ (10.09{\%}). The leading nature of injury was ‘Soft tissue injuries due to trauma or unknown mechanisms’ (46.70{\%}) followed by ‘trauma to muscles’ (6.67{\%}) and ‘heat stress/heat stroke’ (4.90{\%}).Conclusion / Key Practice Points: Combat specific training must be an integral part of any soldier’s return-to-work reconditioning program, especially for reserve personnel.",
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Orr, RM & Pope, RR 2017, 'Ready, Set, Break: Combat Training Injuries in Australian Army Personnel' APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia, 19/10/17 - 21/10/17, .

Ready, Set, Break: Combat Training Injuries in Australian Army Personnel. / Orr, Rob Marc; Pope, Rodney R.

2017. APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Ready, Set, Break: Combat Training Injuries in Australian Army Personnel

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Pope, Rodney R

PY - 2017/10/17

Y1 - 2017/10/17

N2 - Aim: The aim of this research was to investigate combat training-related injuries in Australian Army personnel.Design: Retrospective cohort study.Methods: Injury records covering a 2-year period were extracted from a military injury reporting database. Inclusion criteria were: a) records related to personnel serving in either the Army Reserve (ARES) or Australian Regular Army (ARA) who suffered a musculoskeletal injury (minor, serious or fatal) in the period of interest; and b) the identified injury cause met specific inclusion criteria related to combat training (e.g. battle PT, obstacle course, etc). Reported injury incidence rates were calculated for ARES and ARA and compared, and injury details were descriptively analysed. The Australian Defence (LERP 14-024) and Bond University (RO1927) Human Research Ethics Committees approved the study. Results: In total, 4004 injury records met the inclusion criteria. The overall incidence rate for reported injuries was 6.3 injuries/100 person-years of service (full-time soldier rate = 5.6 inj/100 person-years of service: reserve soldier = 15.1 injuries/100 person-years of service). The leading combat training-related activities to cause injuries were ‘Combat Training’ (44.06%), ‘Physical Training’ (17.68%) and ‘Marching’ (15.61%). The ‘knee’ was the leading site of injury (14.43%), followed by the ‘ankle’ (11.14%) and ‘lower back’ (10.09%). The leading nature of injury was ‘Soft tissue injuries due to trauma or unknown mechanisms’ (46.70%) followed by ‘trauma to muscles’ (6.67%) and ‘heat stress/heat stroke’ (4.90%).Conclusion / Key Practice Points: Combat specific training must be an integral part of any soldier’s return-to-work reconditioning program, especially for reserve personnel.

AB - Aim: The aim of this research was to investigate combat training-related injuries in Australian Army personnel.Design: Retrospective cohort study.Methods: Injury records covering a 2-year period were extracted from a military injury reporting database. Inclusion criteria were: a) records related to personnel serving in either the Army Reserve (ARES) or Australian Regular Army (ARA) who suffered a musculoskeletal injury (minor, serious or fatal) in the period of interest; and b) the identified injury cause met specific inclusion criteria related to combat training (e.g. battle PT, obstacle course, etc). Reported injury incidence rates were calculated for ARES and ARA and compared, and injury details were descriptively analysed. The Australian Defence (LERP 14-024) and Bond University (RO1927) Human Research Ethics Committees approved the study. Results: In total, 4004 injury records met the inclusion criteria. The overall incidence rate for reported injuries was 6.3 injuries/100 person-years of service (full-time soldier rate = 5.6 inj/100 person-years of service: reserve soldier = 15.1 injuries/100 person-years of service). The leading combat training-related activities to cause injuries were ‘Combat Training’ (44.06%), ‘Physical Training’ (17.68%) and ‘Marching’ (15.61%). The ‘knee’ was the leading site of injury (14.43%), followed by the ‘ankle’ (11.14%) and ‘lower back’ (10.09%). The leading nature of injury was ‘Soft tissue injuries due to trauma or unknown mechanisms’ (46.70%) followed by ‘trauma to muscles’ (6.67%) and ‘heat stress/heat stroke’ (4.90%).Conclusion / Key Practice Points: Combat specific training must be an integral part of any soldier’s return-to-work reconditioning program, especially for reserve personnel.

M3 - Presentation

ER -

Orr RM, Pope RR. Ready, Set, Break: Combat Training Injuries in Australian Army Personnel. 2017. APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.