Quantifying mast cells in the urinary bladder, small intestine and the lung

Jessica Anne Smith, Jonathan Tan, Christian Moro

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Mast cells are tissue‐resident immune cells derived from CD34⁺ progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Mast cells are thought to be present within most Ɵssues of the body, although their overall distribution is still not fully understood. Flow cytometry was used to assess the prevalence of mast cells in the urinary bladder, small intestine and the lungs in C57BL/6J mice. CD45.2, CD117, CD34, and FcεRIα antibodies were used to identify mast cells. Preliminary data suggests that CD117+CD34+FcεRIα+ mast cells constitute 4.30% of all CD45.2+ haematopoietic cells in the urinary bladder (n=6), 3.24% in the small intestine (n=6) and 0.11% in the lungs (n=6). This suggests that mast cells constitute a greater proportion of haematopoietic cells within the urinary bladder, and a lower proportion of haematopoietic cells in the lungs. This data will be used to further the current understanding towards the distribution of mast cells within these organs. Further studies in this area may also facilitate an enhanced understanding of how the systemic distribution and prevalence of mast cells changes during inflammatory diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberP‐0158
Pages (from-to)166
Number of pages1
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume51
Issue numberS1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

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