Public sector perceptions of early contractor involvement for delivering social infrastructure

Damien O’Donoghue, Peter E D Love, Jim Smith

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

There have been widespread calls for the public sector to use of non-traditional delivery methods so as to obtain better ‘value for money’. Early contractor involvement (ECI) is one form of delivery approach that has begun to attract the attention of many Australian State Governments, as it allows a contractor to proactively participate in design development, risk management and the construction programming processes. Design and construction processes can also be integrated which therefore overcomes the impediments and barriers that have conventionally existed between designers and contractor. Within Western Australia (WA) the use of ECI has been limited in application. Using questionnaire surveys and semi-structured interviews, this research sought to determine the perceptions of public sector representatives about the benefits and barriers of implementing ECI. Findings revealed that a significant proportion of contractors did not have the capability and experience to be involved within an ECI approach. Their preference was the use of a traditional lump sum method. Where there was limited scope for using competitive tendering, particularly on large complex projects, then ECI could be a preferred option for future projects. The paper recommends that the public sector begin to educate designers and contractors about the benefits of using ECI.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century
Subtitle of host publicationConstruction Challenges in the New Decade
EditorsSyed M Ahmed, Hamimah Adnan, Kamalesh Panthi, Salman Azhar, Roshana Takim, Gazan Bozai
Place of PublicationMalaysia
PublisherCITC-VI
Pages439-447
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)1884342025
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventInternational Conference on Construction in the 21st Century: Construction Challenges in the New Decade - Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Duration: 5 Jul 20117 Nov 2011
Conference number: 6th
https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/11048993.pdf

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Construction in the 21st Century
Abbreviated titleCITCVI
CountryMalaysia
CityKuala Lumpur
Period5/07/117/11/11
Internet address

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social infrastructure
public sector
risk management
programming
questionnaire
interview
experience

Cite this

O’Donoghue, D., Love, P. E. D., & Smith, J. (2011). Public sector perceptions of early contractor involvement for delivering social infrastructure. In S. M. Ahmed, H. Adnan, K. Panthi, S. Azhar, R. Takim, & G. Bozai (Eds.), Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century: Construction Challenges in the New Decade (pp. 439-447). Malaysia : CITC-VI
O’Donoghue, Damien ; Love, Peter E D ; Smith, Jim . / Public sector perceptions of early contractor involvement for delivering social infrastructure. Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century: Construction Challenges in the New Decade. editor / Syed M Ahmed ; Hamimah Adnan ; Kamalesh Panthi ; Salman Azhar ; Roshana Takim ; Gazan Bozai. Malaysia : CITC-VI , 2011. pp. 439-447
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title = "Public sector perceptions of early contractor involvement for delivering social infrastructure",
abstract = "There have been widespread calls for the public sector to use of non-traditional delivery methods so as to obtain better ‘value for money’. Early contractor involvement (ECI) is one form of delivery approach that has begun to attract the attention of many Australian State Governments, as it allows a contractor to proactively participate in design development, risk management and the construction programming processes. Design and construction processes can also be integrated which therefore overcomes the impediments and barriers that have conventionally existed between designers and contractor. Within Western Australia (WA) the use of ECI has been limited in application. Using questionnaire surveys and semi-structured interviews, this research sought to determine the perceptions of public sector representatives about the benefits and barriers of implementing ECI. Findings revealed that a significant proportion of contractors did not have the capability and experience to be involved within an ECI approach. Their preference was the use of a traditional lump sum method. Where there was limited scope for using competitive tendering, particularly on large complex projects, then ECI could be a preferred option for future projects. The paper recommends that the public sector begin to educate designers and contractors about the benefits of using ECI.",
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O’Donoghue, D, Love, PED & Smith, J 2011, Public sector perceptions of early contractor involvement for delivering social infrastructure. in SM Ahmed, H Adnan, K Panthi, S Azhar, R Takim & G Bozai (eds), Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century: Construction Challenges in the New Decade. CITC-VI , Malaysia , pp. 439-447, International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 5/07/11.

Public sector perceptions of early contractor involvement for delivering social infrastructure. / O’Donoghue, Damien; Love, Peter E D; Smith, Jim .

Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century: Construction Challenges in the New Decade. ed. / Syed M Ahmed; Hamimah Adnan; Kamalesh Panthi; Salman Azhar; Roshana Takim; Gazan Bozai. Malaysia : CITC-VI , 2011. p. 439-447.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Public sector perceptions of early contractor involvement for delivering social infrastructure

AU - O’Donoghue, Damien

AU - Love, Peter E D

AU - Smith, Jim

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - There have been widespread calls for the public sector to use of non-traditional delivery methods so as to obtain better ‘value for money’. Early contractor involvement (ECI) is one form of delivery approach that has begun to attract the attention of many Australian State Governments, as it allows a contractor to proactively participate in design development, risk management and the construction programming processes. Design and construction processes can also be integrated which therefore overcomes the impediments and barriers that have conventionally existed between designers and contractor. Within Western Australia (WA) the use of ECI has been limited in application. Using questionnaire surveys and semi-structured interviews, this research sought to determine the perceptions of public sector representatives about the benefits and barriers of implementing ECI. Findings revealed that a significant proportion of contractors did not have the capability and experience to be involved within an ECI approach. Their preference was the use of a traditional lump sum method. Where there was limited scope for using competitive tendering, particularly on large complex projects, then ECI could be a preferred option for future projects. The paper recommends that the public sector begin to educate designers and contractors about the benefits of using ECI.

AB - There have been widespread calls for the public sector to use of non-traditional delivery methods so as to obtain better ‘value for money’. Early contractor involvement (ECI) is one form of delivery approach that has begun to attract the attention of many Australian State Governments, as it allows a contractor to proactively participate in design development, risk management and the construction programming processes. Design and construction processes can also be integrated which therefore overcomes the impediments and barriers that have conventionally existed between designers and contractor. Within Western Australia (WA) the use of ECI has been limited in application. Using questionnaire surveys and semi-structured interviews, this research sought to determine the perceptions of public sector representatives about the benefits and barriers of implementing ECI. Findings revealed that a significant proportion of contractors did not have the capability and experience to be involved within an ECI approach. Their preference was the use of a traditional lump sum method. Where there was limited scope for using competitive tendering, particularly on large complex projects, then ECI could be a preferred option for future projects. The paper recommends that the public sector begin to educate designers and contractors about the benefits of using ECI.

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BT - Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century

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A2 - Adnan, Hamimah

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O’Donoghue D, Love PED, Smith J. Public sector perceptions of early contractor involvement for delivering social infrastructure. In Ahmed SM, Adnan H, Panthi K, Azhar S, Takim R, Bozai G, editors, Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Construction in the 21st Century: Construction Challenges in the New Decade. Malaysia : CITC-VI 2011. p. 439-447