Psychosocial and lifestyle predictors of distress and well-being in people with mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic

Justin J. Chapman*, Eva Malacova, Sue Patterson, Nicola Reavley, Marianne Wyder, Wendy J. Brown, Emily Hielscher, Sarah Childs, James G. Scott

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: People with mental illness may be vulnerable to psychological distress and reduced well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to assess psychosocial and lifestyle predictors of distress and well-being in people with mental illness during the pandemic. 

Method: People with mental illness who participated in an exercise programme prior to the pandemic were invited to complete surveys about mental health and lifestyle corresponding to before and during the pandemic. 

Results: Social support reduced, alcohol intake increased, and sleep quality and diet worsened during the pandemic, contributing to distress. Psychological distress was associated with the two or more mental illnesses, and negatively associated with having a physical disease. Better diet appeared to protect against increases in distress; loneliness hindered improvements in well-being. 

Conclusions: Healthy lifestyle programmes designed to improve social connection may improve health for people with mental illnesses during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Psychosocial and lifestyle predictors of distress and well-being in people with mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this