Provoked overt recognition in acquired prosopagnosia using multiple different images of famous faces

David Pitcher, Rebekah Caulfield, A. M. Burton*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Provoked overt recognition refers to the fact that patients with acquired prosopagnosia can sometimes recognize faces when presented in arrays of individuals from the same category (e.g., actors or politicians). We ask whether a prosopagnosic patient might experience recognition when presented with multiple different images of the same face simultaneously. Over two sessions, patient Herschel, a 66-year-old British man with acquired prosopagnosia, viewed face images individually or in arrays. On several occasions he failed to recognize single photos of an individual but successfully identified that person when the same photos were presented together. For example, Herschel failed to recognize any individual images of King Charles or Paul McCartney but recognised both in arrays of the same photos. Like reports based on category membership, overt recognition was transient and inconsistent. These findings are discussed in terms of models of covert recognition, alongside more recent research on within-person variability for face perception
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-166
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
Volume40
Issue number3-4
Early online date15 Oct 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

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