Protein intake induced an increase in exercise stimulated fat oxidation during stable body weight

Stijn Soenen, Guy Plasqui, Astrid J. Smeets, Margriet S. Westerterp-Plantenga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Protein-rich weight-loss diets spare fat-free mass at the cost of fat mass. The objective was to examine if there is a change in stimulated fat oxidation related to protein intake during stable body weight. Methods: Subjects' (BMI 22±2kg/m2, age 25±8 years) maximal fat oxidation (Fatmax) was assessed during a graded bicycle test, before and after a 3-month dietary-intervention of 2MJ/day supplements exchanged with 2MJ/d of habitual energy intake. The parallel design consisted of protein-rich supplements in the protein group and an isocaloric combination of carbohydrate and fat supplements in the control group. Daily protein intake was determined according to 24-h urine nitrogen. Body composition was measured according to a 4-compartment model by a combination of underwater-weighing technique, deuterium-dilution technique and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results: Subjects were weight stable and did not change their physical activity. The protein group (n=12) increased protein intake (11±14g, P<0.05) and had significantly higher daily protein intake vs. control (n=4) (80±21 vs.59±11g, P<0.05). Fatmax increased significantly in the protein group (0.08±0.08g/min, P<0.01). Fat-free mass increased independent of change in body weight (P<0.01), and fat mass and fat percentage decreased (P<0.05). Change in Fatmax was a function of change in protein intake (r=0.623, P<0.05), and not of changes in body composition or VO2max. Conclusion: Increased stimulated fat oxidation was related to increased protein intake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)770-774
Number of pages5
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume101
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Fats
Body Weight
Proteins
Body Composition
Reducing Diet
Indicator Dilution Techniques
Body Weight Changes
Deuterium
Photon Absorptiometry
Energy Intake
Nitrogen
Carbohydrates
Urine
Weights and Measures
Control Groups

Cite this

Soenen, Stijn ; Plasqui, Guy ; Smeets, Astrid J. ; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S. / Protein intake induced an increase in exercise stimulated fat oxidation during stable body weight. In: Physiology and Behavior. 2010 ; Vol. 101, No. 5. pp. 770-774.
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abstract = "Background: Protein-rich weight-loss diets spare fat-free mass at the cost of fat mass. The objective was to examine if there is a change in stimulated fat oxidation related to protein intake during stable body weight. Methods: Subjects' (BMI 22±2kg/m2, age 25±8 years) maximal fat oxidation (Fatmax) was assessed during a graded bicycle test, before and after a 3-month dietary-intervention of 2MJ/day supplements exchanged with 2MJ/d of habitual energy intake. The parallel design consisted of protein-rich supplements in the protein group and an isocaloric combination of carbohydrate and fat supplements in the control group. Daily protein intake was determined according to 24-h urine nitrogen. Body composition was measured according to a 4-compartment model by a combination of underwater-weighing technique, deuterium-dilution technique and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results: Subjects were weight stable and did not change their physical activity. The protein group (n=12) increased protein intake (11±14g, P<0.05) and had significantly higher daily protein intake vs. control (n=4) (80±21 vs.59±11g, P<0.05). Fatmax increased significantly in the protein group (0.08±0.08g/min, P<0.01). Fat-free mass increased independent of change in body weight (P<0.01), and fat mass and fat percentage decreased (P<0.05). Change in Fatmax was a function of change in protein intake (r=0.623, P<0.05), and not of changes in body composition or VO2max. Conclusion: Increased stimulated fat oxidation was related to increased protein intake.",
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Protein intake induced an increase in exercise stimulated fat oxidation during stable body weight. / Soenen, Stijn; Plasqui, Guy; Smeets, Astrid J.; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 101, No. 5, 02.12.2010, p. 770-774.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Protein intake induced an increase in exercise stimulated fat oxidation during stable body weight

AU - Soenen, Stijn

AU - Plasqui, Guy

AU - Smeets, Astrid J.

AU - Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

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N2 - Background: Protein-rich weight-loss diets spare fat-free mass at the cost of fat mass. The objective was to examine if there is a change in stimulated fat oxidation related to protein intake during stable body weight. Methods: Subjects' (BMI 22±2kg/m2, age 25±8 years) maximal fat oxidation (Fatmax) was assessed during a graded bicycle test, before and after a 3-month dietary-intervention of 2MJ/day supplements exchanged with 2MJ/d of habitual energy intake. The parallel design consisted of protein-rich supplements in the protein group and an isocaloric combination of carbohydrate and fat supplements in the control group. Daily protein intake was determined according to 24-h urine nitrogen. Body composition was measured according to a 4-compartment model by a combination of underwater-weighing technique, deuterium-dilution technique and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results: Subjects were weight stable and did not change their physical activity. The protein group (n=12) increased protein intake (11±14g, P<0.05) and had significantly higher daily protein intake vs. control (n=4) (80±21 vs.59±11g, P<0.05). Fatmax increased significantly in the protein group (0.08±0.08g/min, P<0.01). Fat-free mass increased independent of change in body weight (P<0.01), and fat mass and fat percentage decreased (P<0.05). Change in Fatmax was a function of change in protein intake (r=0.623, P<0.05), and not of changes in body composition or VO2max. Conclusion: Increased stimulated fat oxidation was related to increased protein intake.

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