Progressive Resistance Plus Balance Training for Older Australians Receiving In-Home Care Services: Cost-Effectiveness Analyses Alongside the Muscling Up Against Disability Stepped-Wedge Randomized Control Trial

Sharon Hetherington, Paul Swinton, Tim Henwood, Justin Keogh, Paul Gardiner, Anthony Tuckett, Kevin Rouse, Tracy Comans

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Abstract

In this article, the authors assessed the cost-effectiveness of center-based exercise training for older Australians. The participants were recipients of in-home care services, and they completed 24 weeks of progressive resistance plus balance training. Transport was offered to all participants. A stepped-wedge randomized control trial produced pre-, post-, and follow-up outcomes and cost data, which were used to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios per quality-adjusted life year gained. Analyses were conducted from a health provider perspective and from a government perspective. From a health-service provider perspective, the direct cost of program provision was $303 per person, with transport adding an additional $1,920 per person. The incremental cost-utility ratio of the program relative to usual care was $70,540 per quality-adjusted life year over 6 months, decreasing to $37,816 per quality-adjusted life year over 12 months. The findings suggest that Muscling Up Against Disability offers good value for the money within commonly accepted threshold values.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Nov 2019

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Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Home Care Services
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Services
Exercise
Health

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title = "Progressive Resistance Plus Balance Training for Older Australians Receiving In-Home Care Services: Cost-Effectiveness Analyses Alongside the Muscling Up Against Disability Stepped-Wedge Randomized Control Trial",
abstract = "In this article, the authors assessed the cost-effectiveness of center-based exercise training for older Australians. The participants were recipients of in-home care services, and they completed 24 weeks of progressive resistance plus balance training. Transport was offered to all participants. A stepped-wedge randomized control trial produced pre-, post-, and follow-up outcomes and cost data, which were used to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios per quality-adjusted life year gained. Analyses were conducted from a health provider perspective and from a government perspective. From a health-service provider perspective, the direct cost of program provision was $303 per person, with transport adding an additional $1,920 per person. The incremental cost-utility ratio of the program relative to usual care was $70,540 per quality-adjusted life year over 6 months, decreasing to $37,816 per quality-adjusted life year over 12 months. The findings suggest that Muscling Up Against Disability offers good value for the money within commonly accepted threshold values.",
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language = "English",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Journal of Aging and Physical Activity",
issn = "1063-8652",
publisher = "HUMAN KINETICS PUBL INC",

}

Progressive Resistance Plus Balance Training for Older Australians Receiving In-Home Care Services : Cost-Effectiveness Analyses Alongside the Muscling Up Against Disability Stepped-Wedge Randomized Control Trial. / Hetherington, Sharon; Swinton, Paul; Henwood, Tim; Keogh, Justin; Gardiner, Paul; Tuckett, Anthony; Rouse, Kevin; Comans, Tracy.

In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 12.11.2019, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T2 - Cost-Effectiveness Analyses Alongside the Muscling Up Against Disability Stepped-Wedge Randomized Control Trial

AU - Hetherington, Sharon

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AU - Henwood, Tim

AU - Keogh, Justin

AU - Gardiner, Paul

AU - Tuckett, Anthony

AU - Rouse, Kevin

AU - Comans, Tracy

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AB - In this article, the authors assessed the cost-effectiveness of center-based exercise training for older Australians. The participants were recipients of in-home care services, and they completed 24 weeks of progressive resistance plus balance training. Transport was offered to all participants. A stepped-wedge randomized control trial produced pre-, post-, and follow-up outcomes and cost data, which were used to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios per quality-adjusted life year gained. Analyses were conducted from a health provider perspective and from a government perspective. From a health-service provider perspective, the direct cost of program provision was $303 per person, with transport adding an additional $1,920 per person. The incremental cost-utility ratio of the program relative to usual care was $70,540 per quality-adjusted life year over 6 months, decreasing to $37,816 per quality-adjusted life year over 12 months. The findings suggest that Muscling Up Against Disability offers good value for the money within commonly accepted threshold values.

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