Profiling the New Zealand Police Physical Appraisal Test

Rob Marc Orr, Elisa Canetti, Jason Movshovich, Robert Lockie, Jay Dawes, Ben Schram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Purpose: The aims of this study were to evaluate fitness levels in a cohort of police trainees and compare these results to other police trainees and the general population. 
Methods: Retrospective data for 274 male and 152 female Police trainees were supplied. Measures included height, body mass, and Physical Appraisal Test (PAT; 2.4 km run, vertical jump, push-ups and grip strength) results, assessed twice, prior to commencement of training, separated by several months. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests were used to analyze non-parametric initial and final PAT scores and Mann Whiney U tests were used to determine variance between groups. 
Findings: Male trainees were significantly quicker in the run (-12%, p<0.001), completed more push-ups (+74%, p<0.001) with greater grip strength (+52% left and +50% right, p<0.001) when compared to female trainees. Following the second PAT assessment the significant differences between male and female trainees remained (p<0.001). Only female trainee 2.4 km run times improved significantly between initial and final PAT (-4%, p=0.002).
Value: When compared to the general population from which they were drawn and to other law enforcement trainees, the police trainees in this study were quicker, more powerful and stronger. While there was no loss of fitness between initial and final PAT performance, a conditioning program, spanning the periods between initial and final PAT may be of benefit to increase fitness prior to training commencement especially for female trainees who were generally less fit than, yet must complete the same training as, male trainees.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Emergency Services
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Mar 2021

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