Process evaluation of a patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

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Abstract

AimThe present study developed and evaluated a patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

MethodsTwo frameworks, the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions and the RE-AIM framework were followed. Data to develop the intervention were sourced from scoping of the literature and formative evaluation. Program evaluation comprised analysis of primary recruitment of participants through general practitioners, baseline and end-point measures of anthropometry, four validated questionnaires, contemporaneous facilitator notes and telephone interviews with participants.

ResultsA total of 16 participants enrolled in the intervention. Post-intervention results were obtained from 13 participants, with an estimated mean change from baseline in weight of -0.72kg (95%CI -1.44 to -0.01), body mass index of -0.25kg/m(2) (95%CI -0.49 to -0.01) and waist circumference of -1.04cm (95%CI -4.52 to 2.44). The group education program was acceptable to participants. The results suggest that recruitment through general practitioners is ineffective, and alternative recruitment strategies are required.

ConclusionsThis patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based intervention for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus was both feasible and acceptable to patients. Health professionals should consider the combined use of the MRC and RE-AIM frameworks in the development of interventions to ensure a rigorous design process and to enable the evaluation of all phases of the intervention, which will facilitate translation to other settings. Further research with a larger sample trialling additional recruitment strategies, evaluating further measures of effectiveness and utilising lengthier follow-up periods is required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-252
Number of pages10
JournalNutrition and Dietetics
Volume74
Issue number3
Early online date10 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Education
General Practitioners
Biomedical Research
Anthropometry
Program Evaluation
Waist Circumference
Body Mass Index
Interviews
Weights and Measures
Health
Research

Cite this

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title = "Process evaluation of a patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus",
abstract = "AimThe present study developed and evaluated a patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.MethodsTwo frameworks, the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions and the RE-AIM framework were followed. Data to develop the intervention were sourced from scoping of the literature and formative evaluation. Program evaluation comprised analysis of primary recruitment of participants through general practitioners, baseline and end-point measures of anthropometry, four validated questionnaires, contemporaneous facilitator notes and telephone interviews with participants.ResultsA total of 16 participants enrolled in the intervention. Post-intervention results were obtained from 13 participants, with an estimated mean change from baseline in weight of -0.72kg (95{\%}CI -1.44 to -0.01), body mass index of -0.25kg/m(2) (95{\%}CI -0.49 to -0.01) and waist circumference of -1.04cm (95{\%}CI -4.52 to 2.44). The group education program was acceptable to participants. The results suggest that recruitment through general practitioners is ineffective, and alternative recruitment strategies are required.ConclusionsThis patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based intervention for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus was both feasible and acceptable to patients. Health professionals should consider the combined use of the MRC and RE-AIM frameworks in the development of interventions to ensure a rigorous design process and to enable the evaluation of all phases of the intervention, which will facilitate translation to other settings. Further research with a larger sample trialling additional recruitment strategies, evaluating further measures of effectiveness and utilising lengthier follow-up periods is required.",
author = "Kate Odgers-Jewell and Elisabeth Isenring and Rae Thomas and Reidlinger, {Dianne P.}",
year = "2017",
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doi = "10.1111/1747-0080.12327",
language = "English",
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T1 - Process evaluation of a patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

AU - Odgers-Jewell, Kate

AU - Isenring, Elisabeth

AU - Thomas, Rae

AU - Reidlinger, Dianne P.

PY - 2017/7

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N2 - AimThe present study developed and evaluated a patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.MethodsTwo frameworks, the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions and the RE-AIM framework were followed. Data to develop the intervention were sourced from scoping of the literature and formative evaluation. Program evaluation comprised analysis of primary recruitment of participants through general practitioners, baseline and end-point measures of anthropometry, four validated questionnaires, contemporaneous facilitator notes and telephone interviews with participants.ResultsA total of 16 participants enrolled in the intervention. Post-intervention results were obtained from 13 participants, with an estimated mean change from baseline in weight of -0.72kg (95%CI -1.44 to -0.01), body mass index of -0.25kg/m(2) (95%CI -0.49 to -0.01) and waist circumference of -1.04cm (95%CI -4.52 to 2.44). The group education program was acceptable to participants. The results suggest that recruitment through general practitioners is ineffective, and alternative recruitment strategies are required.ConclusionsThis patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based intervention for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus was both feasible and acceptable to patients. Health professionals should consider the combined use of the MRC and RE-AIM frameworks in the development of interventions to ensure a rigorous design process and to enable the evaluation of all phases of the intervention, which will facilitate translation to other settings. Further research with a larger sample trialling additional recruitment strategies, evaluating further measures of effectiveness and utilising lengthier follow-up periods is required.

AB - AimThe present study developed and evaluated a patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.MethodsTwo frameworks, the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions and the RE-AIM framework were followed. Data to develop the intervention were sourced from scoping of the literature and formative evaluation. Program evaluation comprised analysis of primary recruitment of participants through general practitioners, baseline and end-point measures of anthropometry, four validated questionnaires, contemporaneous facilitator notes and telephone interviews with participants.ResultsA total of 16 participants enrolled in the intervention. Post-intervention results were obtained from 13 participants, with an estimated mean change from baseline in weight of -0.72kg (95%CI -1.44 to -0.01), body mass index of -0.25kg/m(2) (95%CI -0.49 to -0.01) and waist circumference of -1.04cm (95%CI -4.52 to 2.44). The group education program was acceptable to participants. The results suggest that recruitment through general practitioners is ineffective, and alternative recruitment strategies are required.ConclusionsThis patient-centred, patient-directed, group-based intervention for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus was both feasible and acceptable to patients. Health professionals should consider the combined use of the MRC and RE-AIM frameworks in the development of interventions to ensure a rigorous design process and to enable the evaluation of all phases of the intervention, which will facilitate translation to other settings. Further research with a larger sample trialling additional recruitment strategies, evaluating further measures of effectiveness and utilising lengthier follow-up periods is required.

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