Problem gambling among international and domestic university students in Australia: Who is at risk?

Susan M. Moore, Anna C. Thomas, Sudhir Kalé, Mark Spence, Natalina Zlatevska, Petra K. Staiger, Joseph Graffam, Michael Kyrios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Young people are a high risk group for gambling problems and university (college) students fall into that category. Given the high accessibility of gambling in Australia and its association with entertainment, students from overseas countries, particularly those where gambling is restricted or illegal, may be particularly vulnerable. This study examines problem gambling and its correlates among international and domestic university students using a sample of 836 domestic students (286 males; 546 females); and 764 international students (369 males; 396 females) at three Australian universities. Our findings indicate that although most students gamble infrequently, around 5 % of students are problem gamblers, a proportion higher than that in the general adult population. Popular gambling choices include games known to be associated with risk (cards, horse races, sports betting, casino games, and gaming machines) as well as lotto/scratch tickets. Males are more likely to be problem gamblers than females, and almost 10 % of male international students could be classified as problem gamblers. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that male gender, international student status, financial stress, negative affect and frequency of gambling on sports, horses/dogs, table games, casino gaming machines, internet casino games and bingo all significantly predicted problem gambling. Results from this study could inform gambling-education programs in universities as they indicate which groups are more vulnerable and specify which games pose more risk of problem gambling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-230
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Gambling Studies
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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Cite this

Moore, Susan M. ; Thomas, Anna C. ; Kalé, Sudhir ; Spence, Mark ; Zlatevska, Natalina ; Staiger, Petra K. ; Graffam, Joseph ; Kyrios, Michael. / Problem gambling among international and domestic university students in Australia : Who is at risk?. In: Journal of Gambling Studies. 2013 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 217-230.
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title = "Problem gambling among international and domestic university students in Australia: Who is at risk?",
abstract = "Young people are a high risk group for gambling problems and university (college) students fall into that category. Given the high accessibility of gambling in Australia and its association with entertainment, students from overseas countries, particularly those where gambling is restricted or illegal, may be particularly vulnerable. This study examines problem gambling and its correlates among international and domestic university students using a sample of 836 domestic students (286 males; 546 females); and 764 international students (369 males; 396 females) at three Australian universities. Our findings indicate that although most students gamble infrequently, around 5 {\%} of students are problem gamblers, a proportion higher than that in the general adult population. Popular gambling choices include games known to be associated with risk (cards, horse races, sports betting, casino games, and gaming machines) as well as lotto/scratch tickets. Males are more likely to be problem gamblers than females, and almost 10 {\%} of male international students could be classified as problem gamblers. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that male gender, international student status, financial stress, negative affect and frequency of gambling on sports, horses/dogs, table games, casino gaming machines, internet casino games and bingo all significantly predicted problem gambling. Results from this study could inform gambling-education programs in universities as they indicate which groups are more vulnerable and specify which games pose more risk of problem gambling.",
author = "Moore, {Susan M.} and Thomas, {Anna C.} and Sudhir Kal{\'e} and Mark Spence and Natalina Zlatevska and Staiger, {Petra K.} and Joseph Graffam and Michael Kyrios",
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Moore, SM, Thomas, AC, Kalé, S, Spence, M, Zlatevska, N, Staiger, PK, Graffam, J & Kyrios, M 2013, 'Problem gambling among international and domestic university students in Australia: Who is at risk?' Journal of Gambling Studies, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 217-230. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-012-9309-x

Problem gambling among international and domestic university students in Australia : Who is at risk? / Moore, Susan M.; Thomas, Anna C.; Kalé, Sudhir; Spence, Mark; Zlatevska, Natalina; Staiger, Petra K.; Graffam, Joseph; Kyrios, Michael.

In: Journal of Gambling Studies, Vol. 29, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 217-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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