Primary analysis of the Mandarin-speaking sub-study within the Sydney diabetes prevention program

Cecilia Y Taing, Alice A Gibson, Stephen Colagiuri, Philip Vita, Magnolia Cardona-Morrell, Adrian Bauman, Michael Moore, Mandy Williams, Andrew Milat, Jacky Hony, Sophia Lin, Melissa Gwizd, Maria A Fiatarone Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

AIM: There is strong and consistent evidence from large scale randomised controlled trials that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed through lifestyle modification which improves diet quality, increases physical activity and achieves weight loss in people at risk. Worldwide, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in individuals of Chinese descent. Culturally tailored programs are required to address the risk in the Chinese population. This paper analyses effectiveness of a culturally tailored community-based lifestyle modification program (Sydney Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPP)) targeting Mandarin speakers. The SDPP was a 12 month translational study aiming to promote increased physical activity and dietary changes. Effectiveness was assessed through the improvement of anthropometric, metabolic, physical activity and dietary outcomes and number of goals met.

METHODS: Seventy-eight Mandarin-speaking participants at a high risk (Australian Diabetes Risk, AUSDRISK≥15) of developing diabetes were recruited for this study.

RESULTS: In this cohort, waist circumference, total cholesterol and fat intake significantly improved at the 12-month review. In comparison to the English-speaking stream, the Mandarin-speaking stream achieved fewer improvements in outcomes and goals.

CONCLUSION: The SDPP was not effective in reducing the risk factors associated with developing type 2 diabetes in this cohort of high risk Mandarin-speaking individuals living in Sydney.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-126
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume132
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

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