Pricing third party access to essential infrastructure: Principles and practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Third party access to the services of essential infrastructure facilities is a contentious issue acrossa range of core Australian industries, including gas and electricity supply. This articleinvestigates the complex task of setting access fees, since disputes between infrastructure ownersand access seekers typically centre on the price at which access will be offered. Against thebackground of the national access regime enacted by Part IIIA of the Trade Practices Act 1974(Cth) and recent legal decisions, the article explains the competing methodologies by which accessprices are determined, and identifies the positive and negative aspects of each. While the articlecontends that there is no universally superior method for pricing third party access – rather, theappropriate approach will vary from case to case – certain policy recommendations in respect ofaccess pricing can be made
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-194
Number of pages23
JournalAustralian Resources and Energy Law Journal
Volume24
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

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pricing
infrastructure
electricity supply
gas industry
fee
respect
act
methodology

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title = "Pricing third party access to essential infrastructure: Principles and practice",
abstract = "Third party access to the services of essential infrastructure facilities is a contentious issue acrossa range of core Australian industries, including gas and electricity supply. This articleinvestigates the complex task of setting access fees, since disputes between infrastructure ownersand access seekers typically centre on the price at which access will be offered. Against thebackground of the national access regime enacted by Part IIIA of the Trade Practices Act 1974(Cth) and recent legal decisions, the article explains the competing methodologies by which accessprices are determined, and identifies the positive and negative aspects of each. While the articlecontends that there is no universally superior method for pricing third party access – rather, theappropriate approach will vary from case to case – certain policy recommendations in respect ofaccess pricing can be made",
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Pricing third party access to essential infrastructure : Principles and practice. / Marshall, Brenda.

In: Australian Resources and Energy Law Journal, Vol. 24, No. 2, 2005, p. 172-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Third party access to the services of essential infrastructure facilities is a contentious issue acrossa range of core Australian industries, including gas and electricity supply. This articleinvestigates the complex task of setting access fees, since disputes between infrastructure ownersand access seekers typically centre on the price at which access will be offered. Against thebackground of the national access regime enacted by Part IIIA of the Trade Practices Act 1974(Cth) and recent legal decisions, the article explains the competing methodologies by which accessprices are determined, and identifies the positive and negative aspects of each. While the articlecontends that there is no universally superior method for pricing third party access – rather, theappropriate approach will vary from case to case – certain policy recommendations in respect ofaccess pricing can be made

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