Preventing tactical training injuries: progress & the future

Rodney Pope, Rob Marc Orr

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Aim: To provide a candid overview of progress in preventing tactical training injuries and critical considerations for future success.

Design: Critical review with application to real-world settings.

Methods: Key studies we have previously conducted were purposively selected to inform this review. Strengths and limitations of included studies were identified and key data extracted and tabulated, prior to narrative synthesis.

Results: Evidence of success in reducing tactical training injury risks is weak and spasmodic. The aetiology of tactical injuries is multifactorial and each individual intrinsic risk factor typically explains only a small (1-5%) proportion of individual variability in injury risk. Nevertheless, the cumulative effects of these risk factors over successive training activities can be large. Extrinsic risk factors and hazards are also important. Injury reporting systems underestimate injury rates, sometimes very substantially, and often do not identify important emerging injury patterns and sources, for a range of reasons. They are ineffective in identifying injury risks for novel tactical activities and contexts and for small tactical teams, can lead to an underappreciation of injuries sustained (especially minor personal injuries) and are insufficient for measuring improvement.

Conclusion / Key Practice Points: All contributors to injuries must be considered. Risk identification by diverse experts and causal analyses are important methods of identifying risks and risk sources. Injury reporting rates, not just reported rates, must be considered. In the future, optimised technology may enable earlier identification of emerging risks.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 17 Oct 2017
EventAPA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017 - Cockle Bay Wharf, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 19 Oct 201721 Oct 2017

Conference

ConferenceAPA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period19/10/1721/10/17
OtherAustralian Physiotherapy Association (APA) Momentum 2017 is organized by Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) and would be held during Oct 19 - 21, 2017 at Cockle Bay Wharf, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The target audience for this medical meeting basically for Physicians.

Physiotherapists have always been innovators in health, pushing forward to deliver excellent patient outcomes.

As the healthcare landscape becomes more competitive, it is important to keep moving with the changes. MOMENTUM 2017, the APA national conference will empower you to be part of the future of Australian and global physiotherapy.

Join with the rest of the profession to hear from leaders in physiotherapy about the latest clinical research. Meet the people you need to know to help you grow in your profession and discover the newest innovations.

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Cite this

Pope, R., & Orr, R. M. (2017). Preventing tactical training injuries: progress & the future. APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.
Pope, Rodney ; Orr, Rob Marc. / Preventing tactical training injuries: progress & the future. APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.
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Pope, R & Orr, RM 2017, 'Preventing tactical training injuries: progress & the future' APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia, 19/10/17 - 21/10/17, .

Preventing tactical training injuries: progress & the future. / Pope, Rodney; Orr, Rob Marc.

2017. APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearchpeer-review

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AB - Aim: To provide a candid overview of progress in preventing tactical training injuries and critical considerations for future success.Design: Critical review with application to real-world settings.Methods: Key studies we have previously conducted were purposively selected to inform this review. Strengths and limitations of included studies were identified and key data extracted and tabulated, prior to narrative synthesis.Results: Evidence of success in reducing tactical training injury risks is weak and spasmodic. The aetiology of tactical injuries is multifactorial and each individual intrinsic risk factor typically explains only a small (1-5%) proportion of individual variability in injury risk. Nevertheless, the cumulative effects of these risk factors over successive training activities can be large. Extrinsic risk factors and hazards are also important. Injury reporting systems underestimate injury rates, sometimes very substantially, and often do not identify important emerging injury patterns and sources, for a range of reasons. They are ineffective in identifying injury risks for novel tactical activities and contexts and for small tactical teams, can lead to an underappreciation of injuries sustained (especially minor personal injuries) and are insufficient for measuring improvement. Conclusion / Key Practice Points: All contributors to injuries must be considered. Risk identification by diverse experts and causal analyses are important methods of identifying risks and risk sources. Injury reporting rates, not just reported rates, must be considered. In the future, optimised technology may enable earlier identification of emerging risks.

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Pope R, Orr RM. Preventing tactical training injuries: progress & the future. 2017. APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.