Prevalence of malnutrition and poor food intake and their association with health-related outcomes in older adults in Indian hospitals

Charlene Matthews, Bhuwaneshwari Shankar, Skye Marshall, Ekta Agarwal

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractResearch

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Abstract

Malnutrition estimates in India vary greatly and largely focus on micronutrient deficiencies in rural populations and protein-energy malnutrition in children. To meet gaps in existing literature, this observational prospective cohort study aimed to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and poor food intake and their association with health-related outcomes in older adults in Indian hospitals. As part of the annual nutritionDay worldwide initiative, dietitians from five urban private hospitals collected demographic and clinical (admission date, medical diagnosis, comorbidities, complications) data on patients aged ≥60 years, from 2014-2016. Proportion of food consumed (0%, 25%, 50%,
100%) at one main meal was recorded and data on length of stay (LOS) in hospital, readmissions, and in-hospital mortality were collected 30 days post initial data collection. Malnutrition risk was determined by mapping nutritionDay survey questions to the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST). Overall, 262 patients (mean age: 69 ± 8 years; 65% males) were recruited. The prevalence of
malnutrition risk (MST score ≥2) was 44% (n=109) and one-in-four participants (n=68, 28%) consumed up to half the meal, with “not hungry” being the most cited reason for poor intake. The median LOS was 8 days (range: 1-369), 30-day readmission rates were 7% (n=18) and in-hospital mortality rate was 0.4% (n=1). This study highlights high prevalence of malnutrition risk and poor food intake amongst older adults in Indian hospitals. Findings provide an opportunity for future research, in the Indian acute care setting, to focus on managing nutritional issues and related outcomes in hospitalised older adults.
Original languageEnglish
Article number285
Pages (from-to)53
JournalNutrition and Dietetics
Volume76
Issue numberS1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Aug 2019
EventDietitians Association of Australia 36th National Conference: More than meets the eye - The Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre, Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 12 Aug 201914 Aug 2019
Conference number: 36th
https://daa2019.com.au
https://daa2019.com.au/

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Malnutrition
Eating
Health
Hospital Mortality
Meals
Length of Stay
Child Nutrition Disorders
Patient Readmission
Protein-Energy Malnutrition
Private Hospitals
Nutritionists
Micronutrients
Urban Hospitals
Rural Population
Comorbidity
India
Cohort Studies
Demography
Prospective Studies
Food

Cite this

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title = "Prevalence of malnutrition and poor food intake and their association with health-related outcomes in older adults in Indian hospitals",
abstract = "Malnutrition estimates in India vary greatly and largely focus on micronutrient deficiencies in rural populations and protein-energy malnutrition in children. To meet gaps in existing literature, this observational prospective cohort study aimed to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and poor food intake and their association with health-related outcomes in older adults in Indian hospitals. As part of the annual nutritionDay worldwide initiative, dietitians from five urban private hospitals collected demographic and clinical (admission date, medical diagnosis, comorbidities, complications) data on patients aged ≥60 years, from 2014-2016. Proportion of food consumed (0{\%}, 25{\%}, 50{\%},100{\%}) at one main meal was recorded and data on length of stay (LOS) in hospital, readmissions, and in-hospital mortality were collected 30 days post initial data collection. Malnutrition risk was determined by mapping nutritionDay survey questions to the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST). Overall, 262 patients (mean age: 69 ± 8 years; 65{\%} males) were recruited. The prevalence ofmalnutrition risk (MST score ≥2) was 44{\%} (n=109) and one-in-four participants (n=68, 28{\%}) consumed up to half the meal, with “not hungry” being the most cited reason for poor intake. The median LOS was 8 days (range: 1-369), 30-day readmission rates were 7{\%} (n=18) and in-hospital mortality rate was 0.4{\%} (n=1). This study highlights high prevalence of malnutrition risk and poor food intake amongst older adults in Indian hospitals. Findings provide an opportunity for future research, in the Indian acute care setting, to focus on managing nutritional issues and related outcomes in hospitalised older adults.",
author = "Charlene Matthews and Bhuwaneshwari Shankar and Skye Marshall and Ekta Agarwal",
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Prevalence of malnutrition and poor food intake and their association with health-related outcomes in older adults in Indian hospitals. / Matthews, Charlene; Shankar, Bhuwaneshwari; Marshall, Skye; Agarwal, Ekta.

In: Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 76, No. S1, 285, 13.08.2019, p. 53.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractResearch

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of malnutrition and poor food intake and their association with health-related outcomes in older adults in Indian hospitals

AU - Matthews, Charlene

AU - Shankar, Bhuwaneshwari

AU - Marshall, Skye

AU - Agarwal, Ekta

PY - 2019/8/13

Y1 - 2019/8/13

N2 - Malnutrition estimates in India vary greatly and largely focus on micronutrient deficiencies in rural populations and protein-energy malnutrition in children. To meet gaps in existing literature, this observational prospective cohort study aimed to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and poor food intake and their association with health-related outcomes in older adults in Indian hospitals. As part of the annual nutritionDay worldwide initiative, dietitians from five urban private hospitals collected demographic and clinical (admission date, medical diagnosis, comorbidities, complications) data on patients aged ≥60 years, from 2014-2016. Proportion of food consumed (0%, 25%, 50%,100%) at one main meal was recorded and data on length of stay (LOS) in hospital, readmissions, and in-hospital mortality were collected 30 days post initial data collection. Malnutrition risk was determined by mapping nutritionDay survey questions to the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST). Overall, 262 patients (mean age: 69 ± 8 years; 65% males) were recruited. The prevalence ofmalnutrition risk (MST score ≥2) was 44% (n=109) and one-in-four participants (n=68, 28%) consumed up to half the meal, with “not hungry” being the most cited reason for poor intake. The median LOS was 8 days (range: 1-369), 30-day readmission rates were 7% (n=18) and in-hospital mortality rate was 0.4% (n=1). This study highlights high prevalence of malnutrition risk and poor food intake amongst older adults in Indian hospitals. Findings provide an opportunity for future research, in the Indian acute care setting, to focus on managing nutritional issues and related outcomes in hospitalised older adults.

AB - Malnutrition estimates in India vary greatly and largely focus on micronutrient deficiencies in rural populations and protein-energy malnutrition in children. To meet gaps in existing literature, this observational prospective cohort study aimed to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and poor food intake and their association with health-related outcomes in older adults in Indian hospitals. As part of the annual nutritionDay worldwide initiative, dietitians from five urban private hospitals collected demographic and clinical (admission date, medical diagnosis, comorbidities, complications) data on patients aged ≥60 years, from 2014-2016. Proportion of food consumed (0%, 25%, 50%,100%) at one main meal was recorded and data on length of stay (LOS) in hospital, readmissions, and in-hospital mortality were collected 30 days post initial data collection. Malnutrition risk was determined by mapping nutritionDay survey questions to the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST). Overall, 262 patients (mean age: 69 ± 8 years; 65% males) were recruited. The prevalence ofmalnutrition risk (MST score ≥2) was 44% (n=109) and one-in-four participants (n=68, 28%) consumed up to half the meal, with “not hungry” being the most cited reason for poor intake. The median LOS was 8 days (range: 1-369), 30-day readmission rates were 7% (n=18) and in-hospital mortality rate was 0.4% (n=1). This study highlights high prevalence of malnutrition risk and poor food intake amongst older adults in Indian hospitals. Findings provide an opportunity for future research, in the Indian acute care setting, to focus on managing nutritional issues and related outcomes in hospitalised older adults.

U2 - 10.1111/1747-0080.12567

DO - 10.1111/1747-0080.12567

M3 - Meeting Abstract

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SP - 53

JO - Nutrition and Dietetics

JF - Nutrition and Dietetics

SN - 1032-1322

IS - S1

M1 - 285

ER -