Predicting Specialist Tactical Response Police Unit selection success using the urban rush, 2.4 km and 10km loaded carriage events

Rhiannon Thomas, Ben Schram, Shane Irving, Jeremy Robinson, Rob Marc Orr

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Aim: To determine whether performance on a loaded explosive occupational task (Urban Rush), or distance based load carriage tasks (2.4 km or 10 km) were indicative of officer success on a specialist tactical response selection course (SSC).
Design: A retrospective cohort study
Method: Eighteen male police officers (mean age = 32.10±5.04 yrs; mean height = 183.72±5.79 cm; mean weight = 89.44±8.56 kg; mean Body Mass Index (BMI) = 26.45±1.58 kg/m2) participated in the SSC over 5 consecutive days. Data were categorised into: Group 1 (successful specialist selection applicants) and Group 2 (unsuccessful applicants). Independent sample t-tests, Pearson’s correlations and a linear regression determined the differences and relationship between anthropometric and event performance data with alpha levels set at p=.05 a priori.
Results: Height (p=0.025), body weight (p=0.007) and 2.4km loaded March event performance (p=0.013) were significantly different between groups. All three performance measures were significant predictors of success accounting for 44% of the variance in outcomes, however, the 2.4km loaded march was the
strongest (r2 = 0.33) and only significant independent (adjusted r2 = 0.29) predictor of success.
Conclusion: While a loaded 2.4km event is associated with success, a ceiling effect for an explosive anaerobic task and longer 10 km task may exist whereby increases in performance are not associated with selection success.
Original languageEnglish
Pages288
Publication statusPublished - 17 Oct 2019
EventTRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference - Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 17 Oct 201919 Oct 2019
https://transform.physio/
https://transform.physio/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Abstract_Book_Adelaide_2019.pdf (Abstracts)
https://transform.physio/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/APA_2019_POCKET_PROGRAM_A5_2.pdf%22 (Full Program)

Conference

ConferenceTRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period17/10/1919/10/19
Internet address

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Police
Linear Models
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Weights and Measures

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Thomas, R., Schram, B., Irving, S., Robinson, J., & Orr, R. M. (2019). Predicting Specialist Tactical Response Police Unit selection success using the urban rush, 2.4 km and 10km loaded carriage events. 288. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
Thomas, Rhiannon ; Schram, Ben ; Irving, Shane ; Robinson, Jeremy ; Orr, Rob Marc. / Predicting Specialist Tactical Response Police Unit selection success using the urban rush, 2.4 km and 10km loaded carriage events. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
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abstract = "Aim: To determine whether performance on a loaded explosive occupational task (Urban Rush), or distance based load carriage tasks (2.4 km or 10 km) were indicative of officer success on a specialist tactical response selection course (SSC).Design: A retrospective cohort studyMethod: Eighteen male police officers (mean age = 32.10±5.04 yrs; mean height = 183.72±5.79 cm; mean weight = 89.44±8.56 kg; mean Body Mass Index (BMI) = 26.45±1.58 kg/m2) participated in the SSC over 5 consecutive days. Data were categorised into: Group 1 (successful specialist selection applicants) and Group 2 (unsuccessful applicants). Independent sample t-tests, Pearson’s correlations and a linear regression determined the differences and relationship between anthropometric and event performance data with alpha levels set at p=.05 a priori.Results: Height (p=0.025), body weight (p=0.007) and 2.4km loaded March event performance (p=0.013) were significantly different between groups. All three performance measures were significant predictors of success accounting for 44{\%} of the variance in outcomes, however, the 2.4km loaded march was thestrongest (r2 = 0.33) and only significant independent (adjusted r2 = 0.29) predictor of success.Conclusion: While a loaded 2.4km event is associated with success, a ceiling effect for an explosive anaerobic task and longer 10 km task may exist whereby increases in performance are not associated with selection success.",
author = "Rhiannon Thomas and Ben Schram and Shane Irving and Jeremy Robinson and Orr, {Rob Marc}",
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Thomas, R, Schram, B, Irving, S, Robinson, J & Orr, RM 2019, 'Predicting Specialist Tactical Response Police Unit selection success using the urban rush, 2.4 km and 10km loaded carriage events' TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia, 17/10/19 - 19/10/19, pp. 288.

Predicting Specialist Tactical Response Police Unit selection success using the urban rush, 2.4 km and 10km loaded carriage events. / Thomas, Rhiannon ; Schram, Ben; Irving, Shane; Robinson, Jeremy ; Orr, Rob Marc.

2019. 288 Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Predicting Specialist Tactical Response Police Unit selection success using the urban rush, 2.4 km and 10km loaded carriage events

AU - Thomas, Rhiannon

AU - Schram, Ben

AU - Irving, Shane

AU - Robinson, Jeremy

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

PY - 2019/10/17

Y1 - 2019/10/17

N2 - Aim: To determine whether performance on a loaded explosive occupational task (Urban Rush), or distance based load carriage tasks (2.4 km or 10 km) were indicative of officer success on a specialist tactical response selection course (SSC).Design: A retrospective cohort studyMethod: Eighteen male police officers (mean age = 32.10±5.04 yrs; mean height = 183.72±5.79 cm; mean weight = 89.44±8.56 kg; mean Body Mass Index (BMI) = 26.45±1.58 kg/m2) participated in the SSC over 5 consecutive days. Data were categorised into: Group 1 (successful specialist selection applicants) and Group 2 (unsuccessful applicants). Independent sample t-tests, Pearson’s correlations and a linear regression determined the differences and relationship between anthropometric and event performance data with alpha levels set at p=.05 a priori.Results: Height (p=0.025), body weight (p=0.007) and 2.4km loaded March event performance (p=0.013) were significantly different between groups. All three performance measures were significant predictors of success accounting for 44% of the variance in outcomes, however, the 2.4km loaded march was thestrongest (r2 = 0.33) and only significant independent (adjusted r2 = 0.29) predictor of success.Conclusion: While a loaded 2.4km event is associated with success, a ceiling effect for an explosive anaerobic task and longer 10 km task may exist whereby increases in performance are not associated with selection success.

AB - Aim: To determine whether performance on a loaded explosive occupational task (Urban Rush), or distance based load carriage tasks (2.4 km or 10 km) were indicative of officer success on a specialist tactical response selection course (SSC).Design: A retrospective cohort studyMethod: Eighteen male police officers (mean age = 32.10±5.04 yrs; mean height = 183.72±5.79 cm; mean weight = 89.44±8.56 kg; mean Body Mass Index (BMI) = 26.45±1.58 kg/m2) participated in the SSC over 5 consecutive days. Data were categorised into: Group 1 (successful specialist selection applicants) and Group 2 (unsuccessful applicants). Independent sample t-tests, Pearson’s correlations and a linear regression determined the differences and relationship between anthropometric and event performance data with alpha levels set at p=.05 a priori.Results: Height (p=0.025), body weight (p=0.007) and 2.4km loaded March event performance (p=0.013) were significantly different between groups. All three performance measures were significant predictors of success accounting for 44% of the variance in outcomes, however, the 2.4km loaded march was thestrongest (r2 = 0.33) and only significant independent (adjusted r2 = 0.29) predictor of success.Conclusion: While a loaded 2.4km event is associated with success, a ceiling effect for an explosive anaerobic task and longer 10 km task may exist whereby increases in performance are not associated with selection success.

M3 - Abstract

SP - 288

ER -

Thomas R, Schram B, Irving S, Robinson J, Orr RM. Predicting Specialist Tactical Response Police Unit selection success using the urban rush, 2.4 km and 10km loaded carriage events. 2019. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.