Poor-quality prenatal dietary patterns are related to the mental health of mothers and children - could dietary improvement break the cycle?

Samantha L Dawson, Wolfgang Marx, Felice Jacka

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearch

Abstract

[Extract] Poor-quality prenatal diets are related to antenatal depressive symptoms and stress in women.1 Likewise, prenatal depressive symptoms and unhealthy diets are both independently associated with higher levels of child emotional-behavioral dysregulation. Addressing diet may influence multiple interconnected pathways that are relevant to the pathogenesis of mental disorder, such as gut microbiota, inflammatory status, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, oxidative stress, and brain-derived neurotrophic factors. This raises the question: can dietary improvement in pregnancy prevent mental disorders in mothers and help prevent the intergenerational transmission of mental ill-health to children? If so, what dietary advice should be followed, and would this advice change based on the disorder?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-282
Number of pages2
JournalRevista da Associacao Brasileira de Psiquiatria
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Mental Health
Mothers
Diet
Mental Disorders
Depression
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Oxidative Stress
Pregnancy
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

Cite this

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title = "Poor-quality prenatal dietary patterns are related to the mental health of mothers and children - could dietary improvement break the cycle?",
abstract = "[Extract] Poor-quality prenatal diets are related to antenatal depressive symptoms and stress in women.1 Likewise, prenatal depressive symptoms and unhealthy diets are both independently associated with higher levels of child emotional-behavioral dysregulation. Addressing diet may influence multiple interconnected pathways that are relevant to the pathogenesis of mental disorder, such as gut microbiota, inflammatory status, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, oxidative stress, and brain-derived neurotrophic factors. This raises the question: can dietary improvement in pregnancy prevent mental disorders in mothers and help prevent the intergenerational transmission of mental ill-health to children? If so, what dietary advice should be followed, and would this advice change based on the disorder?",
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Poor-quality prenatal dietary patterns are related to the mental health of mothers and children - could dietary improvement break the cycle? / Dawson, Samantha L; Marx, Wolfgang; Jacka, Felice.

In: Revista da Associacao Brasileira de Psiquiatria, Vol. 39, No. 4, 01.10.2017, p. 281-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearch

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N2 - [Extract] Poor-quality prenatal diets are related to antenatal depressive symptoms and stress in women.1 Likewise, prenatal depressive symptoms and unhealthy diets are both independently associated with higher levels of child emotional-behavioral dysregulation. Addressing diet may influence multiple interconnected pathways that are relevant to the pathogenesis of mental disorder, such as gut microbiota, inflammatory status, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, oxidative stress, and brain-derived neurotrophic factors. This raises the question: can dietary improvement in pregnancy prevent mental disorders in mothers and help prevent the intergenerational transmission of mental ill-health to children? If so, what dietary advice should be followed, and would this advice change based on the disorder?

AB - [Extract] Poor-quality prenatal diets are related to antenatal depressive symptoms and stress in women.1 Likewise, prenatal depressive symptoms and unhealthy diets are both independently associated with higher levels of child emotional-behavioral dysregulation. Addressing diet may influence multiple interconnected pathways that are relevant to the pathogenesis of mental disorder, such as gut microbiota, inflammatory status, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, oxidative stress, and brain-derived neurotrophic factors. This raises the question: can dietary improvement in pregnancy prevent mental disorders in mothers and help prevent the intergenerational transmission of mental ill-health to children? If so, what dietary advice should be followed, and would this advice change based on the disorder?

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