Pilot evaluation of an electronic game developed to teach medication history taking to pharmacy students

Vien T Truong, Rebekah J. Moles, Carl R Schneider, Paulie Stehlik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: This pilot study aimed to evaluate a novel electronic medication reconciliation game for teaching medication history taking.

Method: Sixty-six final year Master of Pharmacy students used the eMedRec game during nine weekly tutorials throughout semester two in addition to problem-based learning cases. The authors compared the change in selfperceived
confidence and competence surveys in semester two to usual teaching in semester one. Game usability was evaluated using survey the System Usability Scale (SUS) after game exposure.

Results: Difference in student self-perceived confidence after game exposure were comparable to those observed in semester one (difference in mean change -0.31 (-0.72 – 0.08)) while there was a significant increase in self-perceived
competence following game exposure compared to usual teaching (difference in mean change 1.2 (0.66 – 1.80)). The game had a SUS score of 48.5/100.

Conclusions: The eMedRec scored moderately on the SUS and increased student self-perceived competence greater than that observed during usual teaching alone.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-132
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacy Education
Volume19
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Pharmacy Students
semester
Teaching
medication
electronics
Students
evaluation
Mental Competency
Medication Reconciliation
student
Problem-Based Learning
self-confidence
reconciliation
learning
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Truong, Vien T ; Moles, Rebekah J. ; Schneider, Carl R ; Stehlik, Paulie. / Pilot evaluation of an electronic game developed to teach medication history taking to pharmacy students. In: Pharmacy Education. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 126-132.
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Pilot evaluation of an electronic game developed to teach medication history taking to pharmacy students. / Truong, Vien T; Moles, Rebekah J.; Schneider, Carl R; Stehlik, Paulie.

In: Pharmacy Education, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2019, p. 126-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Objectives: This pilot study aimed to evaluate a novel electronic medication reconciliation game for teaching medication history taking.Method: Sixty-six final year Master of Pharmacy students used the eMedRec game during nine weekly tutorials throughout semester two in addition to problem-based learning cases. The authors compared the change in selfperceivedconfidence and competence surveys in semester two to usual teaching in semester one. Game usability was evaluated using survey the System Usability Scale (SUS) after game exposure.Results: Difference in student self-perceived confidence after game exposure were comparable to those observed in semester one (difference in mean change -0.31 (-0.72 – 0.08)) while there was a significant increase in self-perceivedcompetence following game exposure compared to usual teaching (difference in mean change 1.2 (0.66 – 1.80)). The game had a SUS score of 48.5/100.Conclusions: The eMedRec scored moderately on the SUS and increased student self-perceived competence greater than that observed during usual teaching alone.

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