Physical activity and childhood academic achievement: A critical review

Kaitlin Cacciotti, Nikki Milne, Rob Marc Orr

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Question: What effect does physical activity have on
academic achievement?
Design: Critical review of the literature on physical activity and childhood
academic achievement from 1990 to September 2014.
Participants: School aged children between 6-12 years of age.
Intervention: Physical activity was defined as any bodily movement
produced by skeletal muscles that require energy expenditure with
exercise considered as a subset of physical activity.
Outcome Measures: Academic outcome measures included standardized
tests (e.g. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, The Standard Progressive
Matrices, The Palmetto Achievement Challenge Tests,), grades from
academic classes (e.g. mathematics, science, English/language) and
psychometric cognitive tests.
Results: Of 170 potential articles, 10 studies with generally high
methodological quality (mean Downs and Black score of 74%: range 64%
to 82%: Krippendorff’s alpha=0.86) were evaluated. All 10 studies utilised
a diverse variety of physical interventions, with each modality resulting in
positive impacts towards children’s academic achievements.
Conclusion: Physical activity, delivered in different physical modalities,
both during and out of school hours had a favourable effect on academic
achievement and cognitive functioning and performance.
Key Practice Points:
• Increasing physical activity in the school environment can provide
positive effects on academic achievement and cognitive functioning in
school-aged children.
• Investigating the links between physical activity and academic
achievement may help provide evidence for inclusion of increased
physical activity time in schools.
• Further exploration on dose and specificity of physical activity to provide
optimal cognitive and academic achievement outcomes for school-aged
children is warranted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages26
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventThe Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015: Connect - Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 3 Oct 20156 Oct 2015
Conference number: 2015
http://www.physiotherapy.asn.au/Conference2015

Conference

ConferenceThe Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period3/10/156/10/15
Internet address

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Exercise
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Mathematics
Energy Metabolism
Skeletal Muscle
Language

Cite this

Cacciotti, K., Milne, N., & Orr, R. M. (2015). Physical activity and childhood academic achievement: A critical review. 26. Abstract from The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.
Cacciotti, Kaitlin ; Milne, Nikki ; Orr, Rob Marc. / Physical activity and childhood academic achievement: A critical review. Abstract from The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.1 p.
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title = "Physical activity and childhood academic achievement: A critical review",
abstract = "Question: What effect does physical activity have onacademic achievement?Design: Critical review of the literature on physical activity and childhoodacademic achievement from 1990 to September 2014.Participants: School aged children between 6-12 years of age.Intervention: Physical activity was defined as any bodily movementproduced by skeletal muscles that require energy expenditure withexercise considered as a subset of physical activity.Outcome Measures: Academic outcome measures included standardizedtests (e.g. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, The Standard ProgressiveMatrices, The Palmetto Achievement Challenge Tests,), grades fromacademic classes (e.g. mathematics, science, English/language) andpsychometric cognitive tests.Results: Of 170 potential articles, 10 studies with generally highmethodological quality (mean Downs and Black score of 74{\%}: range 64{\%}to 82{\%}: Krippendorff’s alpha=0.86) were evaluated. All 10 studies utiliseda diverse variety of physical interventions, with each modality resulting inpositive impacts towards children’s academic achievements.Conclusion: Physical activity, delivered in different physical modalities,both during and out of school hours had a favourable effect on academicachievement and cognitive functioning and performance.Key Practice Points:• Increasing physical activity in the school environment can providepositive effects on academic achievement and cognitive functioning inschool-aged children.• Investigating the links between physical activity and academicachievement may help provide evidence for inclusion of increasedphysical activity time in schools.• Further exploration on dose and specificity of physical activity to provideoptimal cognitive and academic achievement outcomes for school-agedchildren is warranted.",
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Cacciotti, K, Milne, N & Orr, RM 2015, 'Physical activity and childhood academic achievement: A critical review' The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia, 3/10/15 - 6/10/15, pp. 26.

Physical activity and childhood academic achievement: A critical review. / Cacciotti, Kaitlin; Milne, Nikki; Orr, Rob Marc.

2015. 26 Abstract from The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Physical activity and childhood academic achievement: A critical review

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N2 - Question: What effect does physical activity have onacademic achievement?Design: Critical review of the literature on physical activity and childhoodacademic achievement from 1990 to September 2014.Participants: School aged children between 6-12 years of age.Intervention: Physical activity was defined as any bodily movementproduced by skeletal muscles that require energy expenditure withexercise considered as a subset of physical activity.Outcome Measures: Academic outcome measures included standardizedtests (e.g. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, The Standard ProgressiveMatrices, The Palmetto Achievement Challenge Tests,), grades fromacademic classes (e.g. mathematics, science, English/language) andpsychometric cognitive tests.Results: Of 170 potential articles, 10 studies with generally highmethodological quality (mean Downs and Black score of 74%: range 64%to 82%: Krippendorff’s alpha=0.86) were evaluated. All 10 studies utiliseda diverse variety of physical interventions, with each modality resulting inpositive impacts towards children’s academic achievements.Conclusion: Physical activity, delivered in different physical modalities,both during and out of school hours had a favourable effect on academicachievement and cognitive functioning and performance.Key Practice Points:• Increasing physical activity in the school environment can providepositive effects on academic achievement and cognitive functioning inschool-aged children.• Investigating the links between physical activity and academicachievement may help provide evidence for inclusion of increasedphysical activity time in schools.• Further exploration on dose and specificity of physical activity to provideoptimal cognitive and academic achievement outcomes for school-agedchildren is warranted.

AB - Question: What effect does physical activity have onacademic achievement?Design: Critical review of the literature on physical activity and childhoodacademic achievement from 1990 to September 2014.Participants: School aged children between 6-12 years of age.Intervention: Physical activity was defined as any bodily movementproduced by skeletal muscles that require energy expenditure withexercise considered as a subset of physical activity.Outcome Measures: Academic outcome measures included standardizedtests (e.g. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, The Standard ProgressiveMatrices, The Palmetto Achievement Challenge Tests,), grades fromacademic classes (e.g. mathematics, science, English/language) andpsychometric cognitive tests.Results: Of 170 potential articles, 10 studies with generally highmethodological quality (mean Downs and Black score of 74%: range 64%to 82%: Krippendorff’s alpha=0.86) were evaluated. All 10 studies utiliseda diverse variety of physical interventions, with each modality resulting inpositive impacts towards children’s academic achievements.Conclusion: Physical activity, delivered in different physical modalities,both during and out of school hours had a favourable effect on academicachievement and cognitive functioning and performance.Key Practice Points:• Increasing physical activity in the school environment can providepositive effects on academic achievement and cognitive functioning inschool-aged children.• Investigating the links between physical activity and academicachievement may help provide evidence for inclusion of increasedphysical activity time in schools.• Further exploration on dose and specificity of physical activity to provideoptimal cognitive and academic achievement outcomes for school-agedchildren is warranted.

M3 - Abstract

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Cacciotti K, Milne N, Orr RM. Physical activity and childhood academic achievement: A critical review. 2015. Abstract from The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.